Business, Motoring

Trucking toward the future

Heagney Bros chief executive Mickayla Kerr with their new Scania logging truck. Photo: Matt Brown.

Six-hundred and twenty horsepower, automatic deflating tyres and a computer that scores the driver on their skills – Heagney’s newest logging truck, Truck #35, has everything but the kitchen sink.

Purpose-built for logging to exacting specifications designed by Heagney Bros owners Peter and Patrick Heagney, the trucking stalwarts embraced the opportunity to include the latest safety and environmental features in the Scania Euro V.

Heagney Bros chief executive Mickayla Kerr says the latest noise reduction technology in the heavy vehicle is a welcome feature – especially when travelling through built up areas.

The 620 horsepower, 16-litre V8 boasts an impressive 3,000 newton meters of torque. 
The 620 horsepower, 16-litre V8 boasts an impressive 3,000 newton meters of torque.

“Our drivers are out as early at 3.30am in the morning collecting their first load of the day and with more and more forests being located near or having to travel past residential areas this feature reduces the distinctive noise and rattle of logging trucks,” she says.

“Scania is known for a quiet ride and has a retarder rather than an engine brake making its braking system quiet in built up areas.

“This combined with the lay over bolster system removes the distinctive rattle of the pins as logging trucks drive by.”

Fitted with an 8-speed automatic gear box, the 620 horsepower, 16-litre V8, 54 tonne Scania boasts an impressive 3,000 newton meters of torque.

The EBS braking system and the onboard computer, which measures the trucks weight, adapts to ensure braking is efficient, safe and reliable.

Winches constantly tighten the chains while driving, ensuring that even when a load settles that chains do not come loose while the tyre inflation monitors keeps all the tyres at the correct pressure, reducing tyre wear.
Winches constantly tighten the chains while driving, ensuring that even when a load settles that chains do not come loose while the tyre inflation monitors keeps all the tyres at the correct pressure, reducing tyre wear.

Patchell Group sales manager Glenn Heybourn weighed in on the design of the purpose-built Patchell logging frame and trailer.

“The design length of the trailer was created specifically with safety in mind to enable 6.1 meter logs to be double bunked rather than a single stacked,” Glenn says.

“This reduces the centre of gravity of the load making it safer giving it one of the safest SRT (Static Roll threshold) on the road today.”

Mickayla says the truck has all the tricks, like air operated winches, early bearing failure detectors and central tyre inflation monitors.

The winches constantly tighten the chains while driving, ensuring that even when a load settles that chains do not come loose while the tyre inflation monitors keeps all the tyres at the correct pressure, reducing tyre wear.

It also provides warning if there is a flat tyre and enables the driver to reduce tyre pressure to increase the surface area of the tyre when the conditions require extra traction.

Rob Graham, a member of the Heagney Bros team for more than 15 years has been selected as the driver of the new truck.

The truck was purpose-built for logging to exacting specifications designed by Heagney Bros owners Peter and Patrick Heagney.
The truck was purpose-built for logging to exacting specifications designed by Heagney Bros owners Peter and Patrick Heagney.

Truck #35 will evaluate Rob’s driving, using a Communicator 300.

The reporting tool provides weekly and monthly reporting scoring the drivers performance on fuel, efficiency, and emissions.

But the truck is also built for comfort.

Rob enjoys leather seats, all the safety features and even a fridge to keep the sammys cold.

Redesigned windows, more mirrors and a forward driving position gives him unparalleled vision – especially useful when navigating tricky skid sites.

“It’s a great example of a local business leading innovation and safety,” Mickayla says.

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