Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Hope after company collapse

A young Blenheim couple who faced losing their first home after the collapse of a building business has been thrown a lifeline.

Anastasia Brown and Caleb Mischeski faced losing $50,000 after a now-defunct Blenheim building company was placed into liquidation.

But other businesses have since stepped up to help those burnt by the collapse of Marlborough company Rose Built Homes last week.

Peter Ray Homes have taken on Anastasia Brown’s build on Blenheim’s Taylor Pass Road, which has languished for more than three months.

Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.
Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Peter Ray Homes director Donna Lee says their builders are working at a reduced margin to get her into the house.

“We really want to help Anastasia out,” Donna says.

RBH Limited, trading as Rose Built Homes, was placed into liquidation on 5 September.

It has since come to light the company’s two directors, Kyle Payne and Ryan Butler operated a web of interconnected companies.

Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.
Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.

The pair, who are no longer in contact with each other, have since fled town, leaving some Marlborough businesses out of pocket by at least $1.4million.

More than 40 businesses and subcontractors have come forward to date are worried staff and family members.

A source says the company’s troubles were clear to those in the building industry.

For Anastasia, who put money given to her by her grandparents towards the $338,000 home, says the first sign of trouble was when scaffolding was pulled down.

The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roofs and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.
The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roof and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.

A skip on-site was then emptied on where the couple’s front lawn was going as bills weren’t paid.

“Every week I asked when the roof was coming on, and every week they would say Friday.

“I found out from the plumber, they just vanished, I got incredibly stressed about it so my parents took over,” she says.

“The liquidator cancelled their contract with us. It’s pretty shitty, but I was lucky to find Donna from Peter Ray Homes.”

In January, Butler and Payne transferred 90 per cent of the shares of RBH to a holding company, NOA Development Group Limited.

NOA was removed from the companies register in July.

One unsecured creditor, who didn’t want to be named, says alarm bells for him started ringing in June.

“RBH was charging $2-300sqm cheaper than everyone else but were $16,700 a week in the red.

“It’s bad management.”

Anderson Architectural Design owner Jason Anderson says Ryan and Kyle were not “cut out to run a business.”

“They’re the type of guys you could have a beer with,” he says. “They just weren’t cut out to run a business.”

Jason says there were seven Rose Built Homes houses under construction and another person who had paid a deposit when the company folded.

Former project manager Graeme Andrews resigned from the company six weeks ago after a year with the company.

He says while he is not owned any money, he was “a little bit uncomfortable.”

“I was concerned I maybe wasn’t getting the right information. I had suspicions, but I had no idea.

“All I can say is I don’t have the full picture or the full information.

“Everyone in town knew there were issues.

The reason I did stick around was for the tradies…and for the clients, a lot of which were young couples. I felt for them.”

 

Butler and Payne affiliated companies:

 

Maddison Group Limited – Trading name: Tru Cut Property services

Industry Classification(s): N731340 Property maintenance service (own account)

Registered from 2 May 2017 to 22 Aug 2019

Kyle Payne owns 100% of 2 shares

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne. Ashleigh Broughton was a director until 3 April 2019.

 

3rd Gen Homes Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered from 18 August 2016 – in process of being removed from register for being overdue in its obligation to file an annual return.

Ryan Butler owns 100% of 100 shares.

Carl Ross Butler ceased being a director: 01/12/2016 – but the paperwork to remove him as a director was filed July 2019

Directors: Ryan Butler.

 

RBH Limited

Industry Classification(s):

In Liquidation

Registered from 18 July 2017 to 05 September 2019

NOA Development Group Limited owns 90% of 100 shares (90).

Ross Stuart Butler (Ryan’s dad) owns 10% of 100 shares (10).

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

Rose Built Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered on 16 January 2019 – current

NOA Development Group Limited owns 100% of 200 shares.

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

NOA Development Group Limited

Industry Classification(s): E321120 Land development or subdivision (excluding construction)

Registered from 3 August 2018 to 17 July 2019.

Ryan Butler owns 50% of 100 shares.

Kyle Payne owns 50% of 100 shares.

Marlborough Boys' College head boy Ben Alexander with principal Wayne Hegarty. Photo: Supplied.

End of an era

The principal of Marlborough Boys’ College has resigned and will be gone from the top job by the end of the year.

Wayne Hegarty revealed he will be retiring as principal at the end of December.

The move comes in the wake of a challenging few months at the Blenheim college after allegations of sexual abuse involving a teacher.

The Board of Trustees received his resignation on Sunday evening.

A letter sent out to all parents of students at the college yesterday at noon.

Board chairman Sturrock Saunders says Wayne has “contributed significantly” to the college during his ten years as principal.

“His strength and compassion has also been evident over the past few months while the school has navigated a considerable challenge and it is a testament to Wayne, his senior leadership team and staff that the school has continued providing a very high quality of education in a supportive and settled environment.

“Wayne’s focus has always been the boys and providing them with the very best learning and teaching opportunities to enable them to be the best they can be,” he says.

Marlborough Boys’ College came under public scrutiny earlier this year as allegations hit headlines around New Zealand and overseas.

Wayne and the board of Trustees worked hard to keep disruption to a minimum, Sturrock says.

The former Rangiora High School deputy principal began at the college in February 2010.

He will stay on at the school in a support capacity, undertaking tasks such as start-of-year compliance reporting and planning and continued co-location project work.

Wayne and his wife Joan, a registered nurse, moved to Blenheim in 2011.

“Wayne is a devoted family man and is looking forward to spending more time with his wife, children and grandchildren without the responsibilities that the principal role brings with it.

“We are very pleased to confirm that Wayne will maintain strong connections with Marlborough Boys’ College,” Sturrock says.

With an arts degree from the University of Canterbury, Wayne’s first job was at Hornby High in Christchurch where he spent 13 years.

The Board of Trustees hope to appoint a new principal to start at the beginning of the new year and will shortly begin the selection process

A formal celebration to mark Wayne’s retirement, marking a career that spans almost four decades, will be held later this year, Sturrock says.

“We are also working through the arrangements to celebrate Wayne and his wonderful contributions to Marlborough Boys’ College.

His formal retirement celebration to be held later this year, but further details will be shared once these are decided.

“In the meantime, the school’s focus continues to be on teaching and learning and ensuring that our students are as prepared as possible for their upcoming assessments and examinations.”

A woman is due to appear in Blenheim court charged with unlawful sexual connection on 23 September.

Foster Hope coordinator Leonie McLachlan is grateful for all the donations the charity receives. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Crowded house a problem for pyjama charity

A charity bid to help provide pyjamas to children in foster care needs to upsize its storage in a bid to cope with demand.

Foster Hope Marlborough urgently needs a new storage shed as kind-hearted Marlburians gift goodies to the charity.

The popular initiative stores and sorts donations of pyjamas, clothes, toys and other gifts from across the Top of the South

But local Foster Hope coordinator Leonie McLachlan is running out of room.

“This is such an amazing, giving community and this is a fabulous problem to have,” she says.

The Blenheim mum of four, who has been a foster parent for 22 years, has boxes of donations in her living room and in storage sheds in the garden.

Foster Hope arranged for a shed to be installed but it only holds a fraction of the donations.

With the need for help high, Leonie hopes someone may be able to help in some way- through supplying a shed or sleep out, helping to build it or supplying the materials needed.

Gifts come into Blenheim from across Marlborough and the Nelson Tasman areas before being distributed back to both regions.

The charity also provides help to children under the care of Oranga Tamariki and The Open Home Foundation.

“I have also provided clothing and pyjamas through the hospital social workers both here and in Nelson as well as Grandparents Raising Grandchildren and Fostering Kids and pyjamas to the Woman’s Refuge,” says Leonie.

“I need something here on my property rather than a storage unit as I sort out the donations once the kids are in bed. It’s a big job.

“Ideally it needs to be lined and insulated so the clothes don’t go mouldy or get damp.”

Building regulations means the maximum size must not be bigger than 10 metres square.

As a registered charity, Foster Hope can provide a receipt for any donations.

“I absolutely love what I do, I just love it and any help would be much appreciated,” Leonie says.

To contact Foster Hope, email [email protected]

Robbie Parkes needs a diabetic alert dog to help manage his Type-1 diabetes. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Boy’s best friend a life saver

Four-year-old Robbie Parkes desperately wants a dog, not just any dog however, a dog that will potentially save his life.

After falling dangerously ill in May, the Linkwater boy was diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes.

With no history of the condition in their family, mum Diane Parkes says they have been left reeling by the shock diagnosis.

Robbie has been accepted as a potential candidate for a diabetic alert dog from Australia- but the farming family need $20,000 to make the dream a reality.

For mum Diane, the new addition to the family would be much-needed peace of mind.

“The do can be with him 24/7, on the tractor, when he’s playing, and a big thing is that the dog can be with him at nighttime too.

“It would make such a big difference to our lives.”

Four-year-old Robbie Parkes desperately wants a dog, not just any dog however, a dog that will potentially save his life.
Four-year-old Robbie Parkes desperately wants a dog, not just any dog however, a dog that will potentially save his life. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Dad Gareth is a stock-truck driver and is away for long stretches of time, so Diane checks on Robbie’s glucose levels every two hours throughout the night.

After making an emergency trip to Blenheim when Robbie first got sick, the prospect of a pet who could warn her when her son was ill would be “life-changing”, she says.

“The dogs are trained to wake or get the attention of someone else if they sense something isn’t right.

“They sniff out if levels are too low or too high 10 minutes before it actually happens.

“If the dog was with Robbie all the time it would give me peace of mind,” she says.

Camped out on a stretcher bed in Robbie’s room, Diane has not had a full night of sleep since his diagnosis on Mothers’ Day when he was admitted to Wairau Hospital for three nights.

Looking after the family’s farm, calving and home-schooling Robbie’s two older siblings, means there is little spare time in the day.

An energetic boy who loves to play outside, Robbie needs constant monitoring.

From crying in fear each time he had to have a finger-prick test done, the brave youngster can now do them himself four times a day.

“He had blood test after blood test and needles and drips, but he’s been very brave and we’re really proud of him.

“His body was basically shutting down, he was almost unconscious and couldn’t stop vomiting.

“It would be wonderful to think that an assistance dog would help stop him having to be in hospital again,” Diane says.

The family are holding raffles to help fundraise and have also set up a donation page on Facebook.

“I haven’t liked to ask for the full amount so am trying to raise $5000. It would be an amazing start,” Diane says.

To donate visit www.facebook.com/donate/939821693029494/2391922750884457/

June Maslin was successfully treated for bowel cancer after an at-home test kit detected it early. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Bowel cancer kit saving lives

A Blenheim woman is urging others to take at an at-home test which helped save her life.

When June Maslin got a bowel testing kit in the post, she put it aside; with no family history and no symptoms, at first it seemed like a waste of time.

But she was persuaded by friends to do the test and within a month was diagnosed with a cancerous tumour.

The keen golfer, who has since been given the all clear, is warning others not to ignore the free test kits.

“I nearly didn’t do it but it’s so simple to do and it’s given me a second chance at life,” she says.

The grandmother of one had surgery at Wairau Hospital in April this year and will not need chemotherapy.

She says the 5-minute test detected signs of the cancer before she developed any symptoms.

In the year since it was launched in Marlborough, the bowel cancer screening initiative has seen 15,223 kits sent out.

Sixty-six per cent were returned. The Ministry of Health’s target for return rate is 60 per cent.

“I felt fine, I didn’t have any symptoms, June says. “I really didn’t think there was anything wrong.

“Please do it now, the sooner it’s done, the better peace of mind you’ll have.

“Everybody during this was absolutely marvelous, the hospital staff were fabulous.”

A total of 415 tests have proven positive with 11 of these proving to be cancer.

Nelson Marlborough Health Bowel Screening Programme manager Claudia Teunissen has been helping spread the word at information stalls at festivals, A&P shows and community meetings.

She says the most satisfying part of her role is getting positive feedback from the public.

“People telling me that they have completed the kit and had a negative result.

“Also, when people tell me that I had convinced them to do the test after we had spoken together at another event.

“I also feel I’ve done a good job when people from our priority population want to talk to me individually and even request for a kit to be sent to them,” she says.

For further information visit www.timetoscreen.nz/bowel-screening/

Jamie Arbuckle has revealed his intention to stand for Marlborough Mayor. Photo: Matt Brown.

Arbuckle up for mayor

A Blenheim councillor has revealed his plans to become Marlborough’s youngest-ever mayor.

Just days before the cut off date for nominations, Jamie Arbuckle, 37, has announced his intent to take the top spot from Marlborough Mayor John Leggett.

The move follows an announcement by his wife Sally to run for a seat on council.

Jamie, who has run for the mayoralty three times previously, says he believes his nine years of experience will count in his favour this time.

“It is time for decisive leadership on key regional issues. I will deliver action on the issues that need addressing,” he says.

The councillor of nine years is calling for a Blenheim bypass and a reduction in rates.

He says financial hardship will be a problem faced by some constituents if rate rises continue.

“Rates are not sustainable or affordable. Marlborough has an ageing demographic of 65-plus, and many are on fixed incomes.

“With interest rates dropping near nil returns on savings, financial hardship and cashflow will be a real issue for some ratepayers.

“Plenty of reports come though council on the impact of increasing council rates but there’s never any action. I will change that.”

Jamie says plans for larger ferries will put more of a strain on Blenheim’s already congested main streets.

He believes the community needs to be consulted on all options before a decision is made.

“We need a bypass for Blenheim.

“Larger ferries mean more traffic heading our way. It is not a central government problem. It is ours.

“Removing all the carparks on Grove Road, Main Street and Nelson Street is not a long-term solution. With a government-funded business case we can consult with the community on all the options, with all the costs and facts,” he says.

Jamie says he has been considering running for mayor for a while.

Should he and his wife be successful in their election bids, it would be the first time a husband and wife have both served on council.

“Nothing can be taken for granted and in the next six weeks we will find out what is going to happen but we’ve both been very busy already.

“It won’t be a conflict of interest to me. Sally will represent Wairau-Awatere and I firmly believe that her attentions are the right ones.

“That’s what constituents should be voting on.

“There is a sense of urgency in the community on a number of issues.

“I feel the time is right for me to lead the region”.

Jamie joins current mayor John Leggett and first-time mayoral candidate Rick Ireland in the running for the mayoralty.

Former Junction Hotel owner Mike Pink. Photo: Supplied.

Bar boss pay out to “humiliated” manager

A humiliated part-time bar manager whose bosses told her she had a “superiority complex” has won a $28,606 payout.

Dawn Langdon told the Employment Relations Authority that her job at the Junction Hotel left her “so stressed” she was forced to resign.

Owner Mike Pink was ordered to pay compensation of $18,000 plus additional costs including reimbursement of lost wages, holiday pay and Kiwisaver contributions.

An Employment Relations Authority (ERA) decision released last week by authority Helen Doyle found in favour of Dawn.

She ruled the Marlborough woman was “unjustifiably constructively dismissed and unjustifiably disadvantaged.”

“Mike Pink is ordered to pay to Dawn Langdon the sum of $18,000 without deduction being compensation for humiliation, loss of dignity and injury to feelings.

“There were other actions by Mr Pink in breach of good faith obligations that seriously damaged the employment relationship,” she says in her findings.

The findings come after Mike told the tribunal hearing that the Junction Hotel was owned by a company and not himself personally.

The ERA could find no evidence of that, they said.

Dawn worked at the pub, which has since been sold, from 1 August 2017 to 4 March 2018. She was paid $16 gross per hour.

She told Mike about worries she had concerning bullying behaviour directed at her but says she was made to feel like she was the cause of the problem.

In response to what he called a “tirade” of emails about the situation, Mike told his unhappy employee that she owed him $500.

“In view of the constant e-mails, personal meetings and other contacts you have bombarded me with since you commenced employment with us … I feel it only fair that I should be recompensed for the time wasted unnecessarily.

“I have had to spend hours in replying to your tirades which has kept me away from doing my normal work and as I am partially incapacitated at present, I find this totally unacceptable.

“I think that a figure of $500 is fair and I expect to receive this within 7 days,” he wrote.

Mike also claimed he had lost customers and in one case a company has “discontinued to lodge and eat here” with a loss of up to $1000 per week.

Langdon resigned on the grounds that her employer had breached his duty.

She later said at an ERA investigation meeting in Blenheim on 23 May that Pink made her feel like a “complete failure”.

“I am extremely upset and humiliated over the way I have been treated, when measured against the commitment and loyalty I have shown your business during my employment,” she wrote.

Mike and wife Hazel have sent bought the Wave Café and Courtyard in Picton.

Youngster Tom Robinson endeavours to escape the clutches of Mako loose forward Braden Stewart. Photo: Peter Jones.

Catch me if you can

Youngster Tom Robinson endeavours to escape the clutches of Mako loose forward Braden Stewart during one of the many activities on offer at Sunday’s first Tasman Rugby Union Player Development session for under-11 to under-14 players.

Thirty children and seven Mako past or present players attended the fast-paced Lansdowne Park session, the first of three designed to offer all age group players some intensive coaching and a chance to rub shoulders with the Tasman senior players.

The sessions have been introduced in the wake of the decision to end rep rugby from under-16 down and provide an opportunity for all players to get specialist help. The next two will take place on September 8 and 22.

At a similar gathering in Nelson, 120 children turned up at the Tahunanui venue, along with 10 Mako male players and six female.

 

Marlborough Netball development officer Raramai Nicklin has chocolate rewards for positive supporters at Saturday netball. Photo: Matt Brown.

Sweet deal for netball supporters

An effort to cut bad side-line behaviour has seen Marlborough Netball sweeten the deal for supporters.

To encourage positivity on court, chocolate bars will be handed out to well-behaved sports-fans with the hope the sugary treats will encourage others to mimic their good behaviour.

Marlborough Netball development officer Raramai Nicklin says the reward programme is a bid to support umpires and deal with sideline misconduct.

“You tend to only hear the bad stuff, which is unfortunate”.

Signs at the netball court remind parents and supporters to not take the games too seriously. Photo: Matt Brown.
Signs at the netball court remind parents and supporters to not take the games too seriously. Photo: Matt Brown.

She says bad behaviour is rare, but when it happens it is something that affects both players and umpires.

“It might just be an overzealous parent getting carried away supporting, but it can be aggressive or off-putting to the other players.

“It could just be people criticizing the refs, not necessarily meaning to offend or hurt them, but it’s about educating them too.

“It’s an incentive, an idea, I guess,” she says.

Signs reminding parents and supporters of the fun and relaxed nature of the game can already be seen along the court’s chain link fences.

But Raramai says they want to do more to encourage positive behaviour.

A netball supporter showing the right attitude is rewarded with a block of chocolate. Photo: Matt Brown.
A netball supporter showing the right attitude is rewarded with a block of chocolate. Photo: Matt Brown.

“You can go on and be grumpy about it, focus on the negative side of it, but we want to focus on the positive side and get people to encourage each other.

“It’s actually not that common, but you do hear about it every now and then.

“Every time you hear about it, it’s no less disappointing,” she says.

“Sometimes umpires get a bit of stick, sometimes players get a bit of stick.

“Some people don’t know the rules and think they do.

“People need to realise, especially with the umpires, they’re not perfect, they are all human, they are all volunteers, they are all doing it because it’s part of the game.

“Rather than going around and having to police anyone, we thought let’s really push the positive and get around and reward these people.

“Hopefully, it will pull people in line and reward the people that do the positive stuff every week that doesn’t get mentioned,” she says.

“It’s trying to develop that positive culture within the community.”

Geoff Pybus and daughter, Ever, at the soon to be rebranded Cafe Home. Photo: Matt Brown.

Greek cafe to make itself at home

After 11 years of coffee and food, the owners of Café Home are preparing to call it a day.

Owners Geoff and Nicole Pybus have sold their business, and in it’s place a new owner has planned a Greek café, Eleni.

Nicknamed ‘Miss 100,000 Volts’, incoming owner Helene Marchant is champing at the bit to unleash her vision and unique
Mediterranean flavour on Marlborough.

Incoming owner Helene Marchant. Photo: Matt Brown.
Incoming owner Helene Marchant. Photo: Matt Brown.

Helene, who has lived in Renwick for the last 20 years, says she was sipping coffee at the café late in April when she was struck with inspiration.

“I asked Geoff if he would like to sell, he said to the right person,” she says.

“I said, would I be the right person? He said yes, so we did a deal.”

And Helene has been “firing on all cylinders” getting her ideas and plans for the new eatery out of her head and into reality.

“How beautiful would it be to have a Greek café in the middle of Blenheim,” she says.

Cafe Home owner Geoff Pybus says he isn’t sure what he will do next, but was looking forward to regular nine to five hours so he could spend more time with his children.

The cafe will be rebranded as Eleni. Photo: Matt Brown.
The cafe will be rebranded as Eleni. Photo: Matt Brown.

“[A Greek cafe] is different to what everyone else is doing, it’s going to be cool,” he says.

He hopes that the new restaurant would be open at night.

An accountant by profession, Helene moved to Renwick to work in the wine industry with her husband from Adelaide, South Australia 23 years ago.

Taking over a cafe is a “huge” change of tack, she says the only experience she has running a café is drinking “copious amounts” of coffee and eating fabulous food.

But Helene’s parents, who emigrated from Greece to Adelaide when they were young, had a background in hospitality.

“My aunties, uncles, my grandparents, it must be in the blood there somewhere,” Helene says.

“My mother’s family ran a whole lot of cafes and restaurants and bakeries.

“The food gets drummed into you from an early age, and I’m a great cook,” she says.

Helene says the change of ownership is a new beginning.

“I’m a businesswoman, I’m a resourceful woman and I’d like to think I have what it takes to make Eleni successful,” she says.

“I see an opportunity, and I just go for it.

“One thing I’m not going to do is change the food structure that they have at the moment, and the coffee.

“We have the most amazing coffee.

Helene plans to introduce Greek coffee and meals over time.

“I’m trying to get a liquor license at the moment because the Mediterranean diet is all about food and enjoying it with a glass of wine or beer.”

The cafe will close for renovations on 30 July.

Helene hopes they will open the doors to the new café by 5 August.

Helene says the outgoing owners, Geoff and Nicole leave big shoes to fill.

“And they obviously knew it was time to sell,” she says.

“They’re well respected within the area and I hope I can do as wonderful a job as they have.”