Appointed liquidator Brenton Hunt revealed creditors were unlikely to see any money back from defunct building company Rose Built Homes. Photo: Matt Brown.

Rose Built Homes used as ‘cash cow’

The bungling former owners of a defunct building firm may face criminal charges for fraud.

Rose Built Homes, which folded in September, has left Marlborough businesses out of pocket to the tune of $1.6 million.

Appointed liquidator Brenton Hunt revealed creditors were unlikely to see any money back, branding the case “one of the worst” he has seen in 25-years.

Treating the company as a “personal cash cow” could see former directors Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne in court, he says.

And the former directors have turned on each other, with Kyle blaming some of their dodgy dealings on his colleagues “gambling problems”.

The revelation comes amid rumours that Kyle has fled the country.

Brenton says he can’t stop Kyle from leaving the country.

“I can’t stop him travelling until I actually have judgement against him, and even then, a border alert would require details of his actual flight,” he says.

“Regardless…he can still be bankrupted here in New Zealand.”

Local contractors and businesses have been left high and dry, with one secured creditor owed more than $500,000.

Investigations uncovered a raft of costly personal purchases bought using company funds.

Boats, motorcycles and cars bought on finance were being paid from company accounts but registered to the young company directors.

But Brenton says he doubts any money will be paid out to any class of creditor.

“There were very few assets to be collected. Some office equipment and limited tools were collected from the office.

“The majority of these were returned to Christchurch and sold by Mainland Auctions, limited amount were sold to interested parties in Blenheim.”

“A number of creditors have raised jet skis as another asset, but I have never managed to locate any,” he says.

In addition, Kyle Payne traded a company asset, a Ford Mustang, on an Audi he recorded as his personally.

“The Audi still has a significant amount of finance over and above the trade-in value.”

Tax payments are “well behind” with no annual accounts ever produced.

Brenton says Kyle tried to blame the lack of tax payments on the company’s accountant, however, it is the director’s responsibility to file returns.

PAYE had not been paid since December 2018.

Kyle, in an interview with the liquidator, says he was not aware that non-payment of PAYE was a criminal offence.

“A huge amount of personal expenditure was coded in the company records as business expenditure and GST attempted to be claimed,” Brenton says.

“I have been working in insolvency for ten years, and as an accountant for over twenty-five years.

“Rarely have I seen company records in such a bad state.

“It has been very hard to work out anything form the records kept so I have had to go back to bank transactions.

GST had not been filed since March 2019 or paid since May 2018.

Brenton says Kyle had appeared to have committed “several items” of fraud and a creditor has offered to assist in filing a criminal complaint to police for fraud.

“Insurance records have been altered to allow customers to make drawdowns, customers have been asked to pay into bank accounts which are not company bank accounts and various customers and creditors have been lied to repeatedly,” he says.

“After recoding a lot of the expenditure which Kyle Payne had recorded as business expenditure but was paid to his own bank accounts, I have made a demand for $335,739.

“I have had no response to this demand so are now commencing judgement against him for this debt.”

Kyle sold his house, on Howick Rd, in September.

Brenton says Ryan was cooperative during the liquidation.

“He is apologetic for where everything has ended up and claims he never knew just how bad everything was.

“Regardless of his regrets he was a director and personally guaranteed several of the debts.”

Brenton says Ryan is looking into bankruptcy.

“As there has been very limited recovery from the company, I am funding a lot of the continued work for the liquidation myself.

He says the only asset of the company is the money which the directors had withdrawn in various ways.

“The likelihood of recovery of this for creditors is fairly remote so it is not anticipated any distribution for any class of creditor will happen.

“Regardless of this I will continue with my action against the director and see what comes out of it.”

Alex Nankivell, left and Tim O’Malley lift the Mitre 10 Premiership trophy at Trafalgar Park on Saturday night. Photo: Evan Barnes/Shuttersport.

Mako may have another ‘tiger by the tail’

When Marlborough wrestled the Ranfurly Shield from Canterbury in 1973 Red Devils skipper Ramon Sutherland famously commented that perhaps the little top of the south province had grabbed “a tiger by the tail”.

Forty-six years later Ramon, now president of the Tasman Rugby Union, suggests the nation’s newest union may have done the same thing.

“I think we have got another [tiger by the tail] … it’s one thing to get there, now they have got to keep this standard up … but I’m sure they can,” he says.

On Saturday evening the Mako completed a perfect 12-from-12 season with a 31-14 win over Wellington in Nelson to claim the Mitre 10 Cup premiership title for the first time and underline their status as the country’s leading province.

Although Ramon has been surprised with the speed with which Tasman has risen to the top of the provincial tree, he says good coaching has been the key to success.

Tasman Rugby Union president Ramon Sutherland watched the Mako clinch a perfect season at Trafalgar Park on Saturday evening. Photo: Peter Jones.
Tasman Rugby Union president Ramon Sutherland watched the Mako clinch a perfect season at Trafalgar Park on Saturday evening. Photo: Peter Jones.

“Kieran Keane started it and it has carried on through Leon [MacDonald] and that’s why the improvement has been so fast.”

He feels the Mako’s win will do a lot of huge amount for the sport in the Marlborough/Nelson region.

“It shows that you don’t have to be a big city union to [win the premiership]. With the right encouragement and finances you can do it, but in a small area with a small population everyone has to do a lot of work.”

Although it is hard to compare achievements from different eras, Ramon suggested Tasman’s NPC win was “right up there” with Marlborough’s famous 1973-74 Ranfurly Shield era.

“Coming from a small area we have done exceptionally well.

“We have got some really talented players there and they are just going to get better,” he predicted.

Tasman chairman Wayne Young, like Ramon a former Red Devils player, said his immediate feeling after the final whistle on Saturday was “relief”.

“The way we had performed all year it would have been terrible not to get over the line tonight. Our defence was a huge factor.”

Wayne said the impetus for the team’s success began a few season’s back, under Leon MacDonald’s watch.

“He built a good culture which everyone has bought into, now we have just got to keep that momentum. It’s just providing that balance between our local players coming through and keeping our Super players on track, because we still have to provide a pathway for our young club players – it’s a balancing act.”

When Tasman ran out for their first NPC match, against North Harbour in 2006, they were led onto the park by hooker Ti’i Paulo.

Now based in Marlborough, Ti’i has experienced first-hand the unprecedented rise of the Mako.

After leading them in 2006, when they were very much an unknown quantity, he played 11 seasons in France, before rejoining the team in 2017, by which time the Mako were provincial powerhouses.

“To come back in 2017 was a real buzz for me … to see how far they had come was awesome.

“Thinking back when we first started, I wouldn’t have dreamed about them winning the whole thing, it’s a pretty proud moment.”

He says the most significant change he noticed was self-belief.

“That season [2017] will stay in my memory … the whole club and union had shifted to have confidence in their ability. I felt that when I came back.”

Ti’i says the fact that just 10 years ago the national body was looking to cut the Mako, illustrates just how much grit the franchise had.

“Having that resilience to stay there and become a respected side was a massive positive.”

The fans also played an integral part in helping the Mako survive.

“Everyone just fell in love with the team and their relationship with supporters was always strong.”

He says a premiership title is a “fantastic reward” for the region.

“It will be massive for the both sides of the hill, everyone’s been waiting for them to lift that trophy.

“It makes me very proud to be a Mako.”

Marlborough Chamber of Commerce chief executive Hans Neilson and Marlborough Media director Summa MacDonald. Photo: Andrew Board.

Shop & Win competition puts $5k up for grabs

One lucky Marlburian will win $5000 cash thanks to a new local promotion, Shop & Win.

Shop & Win is a joint promotion between 30 local retailers, Marlborough Weekly and the Marlborough Chamber of Commerce and will see a total of $6000 given to locals.

The competition is simple, buy anything at one of the 30 participating businesses between 22 October and 29 November, fill in an entry form and you’re in the draw.

After six weeks one winning entry form will be pulled from the pile and the name on that entry will win $5000 cash.

There are also second and third prizes of $750 and $250 respectively.

Marlborough Weekly co-owner Summa MacDonald says the competition encourages people to shop locally.

“We have so many fantastic retailers here in Marlborough and this competition is a way to encourage people to support them and go in the draw to win a massive prize,” Summa says.

“It’s such a cool way to get the town buzzing and it’s so simple for people to take part.

“We encourage everyone to fill in a form when you shop because there will be a local winner.”

Chamber of Commerce chief executive Hans Neilson says when you buy local your dollars kick off a multiplier effect.

“Spending your money at independent businesses begins a cycle in which those businesses then spend their money at local shops, support community groups and employ locals.”

Hans says small local businesses are the “economic backbone” of Marlborough.

“Many don’t have large marketing budgets so this offers a resource to raise their profile by being a part of something bigger, something that supports Marlborough as a whole,” he says.

“This is a great campaign and we’re proud to support it.

“It’s a gift to your community, and with Marlborough Anniversary coming what better way to say happy birthday.”

A full list of the participating businesses is on page 9 of this newspaper, or keep an eye out for the Shop & Win posters in the windows of participating businesses. A full list is also on the Marlborough App.

A map showing the proposed changes to the speed limit on State Highway 6 between Blenheim and Nelson. Graphic: NZTA.

Thousands call for lower speed limit plan to be scrapped

Thousands of people have signed a petition calling for traffic bosses to scrap plans to lower speed limits.

New Zealand Transport Authority has recommended that the speed limit between Blenheim and Nelson be slashed to 80kmh.

But fed-up motorists have been quick to hit back, calling for the idea to be ditched.

Driver Stephanie Drewery started the online petition last week which has been signed almost 7000 times by Monday afternoon.

She says the speed limit was increased in the first place as cars became safer.

“The New Zealand speed limit has been 100kmh since the early 1980s.

“The upper limit was set at an increased level because the roads were all tar sealed with a centre line and cars had decent suspension air bags.

“Now a majority of mountain roads have road edge barriers, passing lanes and wider cut corners,” she says.

NZ Transport Agency director regional relationships Jim Harland wants people to make submissions. Photo: Supplied.
NZ Transport Agency director regional relationships Jim Harland wants people to make submissions. Photo: Supplied.

Following a series of public meetings in Marlborough and Nelson earlier this year, NZTA heard from people who attended that speed limits needed to be cut.

But cutting limits is not the answer, says Stephanie, from Nelson.

“Why are the NZTA and the NZ Police so insistent on reducing speed limits on safer roads being driven with safer cars?

“Adults drive to the conditions,” she says, adding new drivers need more training.

Between 2009 and 2018, 20 people died and 92 were seriously injured in crashes on State Highway 6 between Blenheim and Nelson.

Nineteen of these deaths were on 100km/h stretches of SH6 and 87 people were seriously injured were on the open road/ 100km/ hour sections of SH6.

Cutting the limit would help prevent deaths and serious injuries say NZTA.

NZ Transport Agency director regional relationships Jim Harland has called for those signing the petition to take part in the decision process.

“We would ask the people signing the petition to maintain the 100km hour speed limit on much of SH6 to put in a formal submission on the Blenheim to Nelson SH6 speed review and be part of that process,” he says.

The petition will be considered if it is presented on time.

“The petition will be taken into account if it is presented to the Transport Agency within the consultation period (15 October to 12 November), along with other submissions,” he says.

Public consultation period will be open for four weeks before a final decision is made.

Any changes to the speed limits could be in place by the end of the year.

To add a submission visit nzta.govt.nz/blenheim-nelson-speed-review or pick up a submission form at your local council office or library or call 0800 44 44 49 and the Transport Agency will send you one. Alternatively, Email [email protected]

The mystery woman who features on a camera found at the bottom of the Marlborough Sounds. Photo: Supplied.

Treasure trove of photos discovered by divers

A camera that lay lost on the seabed for around eight years has been discovered by divers – with its photos saved in perfect order.

The older-style Canon camera was found in its case by divers taking part in the Waikawa Dive Centre’sfirst Trash to Treasure competition.

Now the search is on to reunite the owners with their precious memories.

Bottles, tyres and more than 2000 other pieces of rubbish were recovered from the region’s waterways during a month-long Picton competition.

The case of the camera has seen better days, but the Canon Ixus 130 camera is, superficially, in good condition. Remarkably, the memory card still worked. Photo: Supplied.
The case of the camera has seen better days, but the Canon Ixus 130 camera is, superficially, in good condition. Remarkably, the memory card still worked. Photo: Supplied.

Waikawa Dive Centre manager Kate Trayling says while trawling for trash in the Grove Arm of the Marlborough Sounds, a family came across a camera – not of the “water-loving” kind.

“We would love to return the card to the owners as it looks like a lot of memories are on it,” Kate says.

Kate, who organised the ‘Trash to Treasure’ competition for the Waikawa Dive Centre, says none of the pictures appear to be taken in New Zealand and heavily feature military aircraft and ships, including the USS Midway.

“We’re hoping to find the owner,” she says.

An image from the camera was posted to Facebook but the owners remain a mystery.

Divers, snorkelers and free divers took to the water to collect rubbish lying on the Sounds’ seafloor for the month-long competition.

Those who collected the most were allocated points, which were tallied up to reveal the winner.

Troy Frost took out the Grand Champion title after “spending hours” hauling up trash.

“Troy waded into estuaries and collected all manner of objects that had been discarded,” Kate says.

“He bought in over 800 bits of rubbish from the water.”

Overall, 2000 pieces of rubbish were removed from Marlborough’s estuaries, rivers and seabeds.

“Zoe Luffman came runner-up after diving with her family most weekends,” Kate says.

“During one dive Zoe managed to pull an old tyre on to the beach that she had dragged up from the seabed.”

Husband and wife duo, Chris and Craig Chapman, took out third and fourth place for their efforts to rid the sea floor of junk.

The winner received a dive computer donated by Cressi New Zealand and an annual launch pass from Marlborough Sounds Marinas.

Kate says she hopes the ‘Trash to Treasure’ competition will become an annual event.

However, next year, she says they will wait for the water to warm up a bit more.

“We’re thinking October or November,” she says.

The NZTA is recommending the speed limit between Blenheim and Nelson be cut. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Speed limits to be slashed on state highway

The 100 km/h speed limit between Blenheim and Nelson is set to be cut to a maximum of 80 km/h.

Speed limits between Blenheim and Nelson should be cut to 80km/h or less permanently say road safety bosses.

And traffic bosses are backing the switch, recommending that it gets the go ahead.

Earlier this year, New Zealand Road Transport Agency revealed plans to look at lowering speed restrictions to help prevent fatalities and injuries on the region’s roads.

New restrictions will see State Highway 6 restricted to 60km/h in some places.

NZ Transport Agency director regional relationships Jim Harland confirmed the recommendation to the Marlborough Weekly.

“After carrying out a safety assessment we are proposing new speed limits along the route.

“We are currently checking back in with key stakeholders and finalising public consultation documents, and plan to formally consult on new speeds within the month of October,” he says.

The move follows several public events across the region to get public feedback.

Under recommended proposals, existing speeds would change just before the roundabout by Pak ‘n Save, dropping from 100 to 80 km/h for the majority of the 114km journey.

Communities are calling for the change, NZTA bosses say.

“We’ve been speaking with the community and local businesses, and other key organisations about how we can make this stretch of road safer

“One thing we heard loudly and clearly from the community was the need to act,” Jim says.

Between 2009 and 2018, 20 people died and 92 were seriously injured in crashes on State Highway 6 between Blenheim and Nelson.

Nineteen of these deaths were on 100km/h stretches of SH6 and 87 people were seriously injured were on the open road/ 100km/ hour sections of SH6.

Sixty-nine-year-old motorcyclist Christopher David Heads of Rai Valley died on Sunday after a crash with a car on Bulford Rd near SH6.

“We are investigating safety improvements, but one of the things we can do right now to prevent people from dying or being seriously injured is reduce speed limits, so they are safe and right for the road,” Jim says.

The consultation period will be open for four weeks before a final decision is made.

Any changes to the speed limits could be in place by the end of the year, Jim says.

The move coincides with a Marlborough Roads review last month asked for feedback on what people feel is a safe speed limit on local roads.

The call saw more than 300 submissions made, with a third in favour of more 50km/h areas.

Feedback from Marlburians on Council’s review of speed limits on local roads has seen more than 470 submissions received from across the district.

Marlborough Roads Manager Steve Murrin thanked those who took the time and effort to make a submission.

“It’s great to hear the views of those who gave us their suggestions and to see so many taking an active interest in road safety in Marlborough,” Steve says.

Canine Pet Therapy coordinator Wendy Reynolds with two of her toy poodles Pearl, left, and Crystal, right. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Therapy dogs keen to spread joy

They have waggy tails, love cuddles and want to help – now all they need are people to visit.

Toy poodles Crystal, 8, and Pearl, 4, are trained therapy dogs and registered with the Marlborough branch of Canine Pet Therapy.

Devoted owner and trainer Wendy Reynolds from Blenheim would love to see the furry duo use their talents in rest homes around Marlborough.

Speaking at the 65th Black Hawk National Dog Show in Blenheim on Friday, Wendy says some rest homes in the area have been slow to take up the offer.

“It would be great to see them be a bit more accepting.

“If you’re not feeling well, a cuddle makes you feel better,” she says.

As the Marlborough co-ordinator for the therapy group, Wendy and two of her four poodles joined thousands of other people and pooches at Marlborough Lines Stadium 2000.

And the dogs proved popular with visitors who rushed to cuddle them.

Crystal has a natural ability with people, says Wendy who was also entering her poodles in the show’s agility classes at the weekend.

“She has a hunger for people, she just wants to be around them.

“She has so much to give but once she’s 10-years-old she won’t do agility anymore and it would be great to see her still involved in the community.”

Health research in New Zealand and overseas shows many people show great improvement in their health and attitude through interaction with visiting animals.

Canine Friends Pet Therapy is a New Zealand-wide network of people who share their friendly, well behaved dogs with patients in hospitals and residents in rest homes/hospices.

The service is free and helps spread happiness,” says Wendy.

“One Christmas I put all four dogs in a pram, decorated it with tinsel and took them in [to a rest home], in their Santa suits. Everyone was do happy to see him.”

Wendy is looking for more volunteers as well as places for the therapy dogs to visit.

She says any dog, given the right training, can be a therapy dog.

“You’ve got to be committed and even after all this time, I’m still training them.

“To raise a dog is like raising a toddler, you have to teach them manners.”

For further information visit caninefriends.org.nz

Café Herb and Olive owner Richard Barton with 10-year-old fox terrier Pepe. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Paws clause gives dog-friendly businesses mark of approval

Dog-friendly businesses are set to get the paws-up, displaying special stickers where pooches are welcome.

For the first time in decades, dogs are allowed in Blenheim’s town centre from Tuesday as a bylaw banning them is lifted for a month.

And a specially made paw print sticker will go up in businesses around town where pooches are permitted.

For Richard Barton from café Herb & Olive, allowing dogs in with customers was an easy decision to make.

“I have no problem with dogs being outside,” he says.

The 65th Black Hawk National Dog Show gets underway in Blenheim between 2 and 5 October.

With up to 1200 dogs expected at the event, the by law will be lifted for the whole month.

The Blenheim Business Association (BBA) have organised the stickers which feature a black paw print with a heart in it.

These ‘dog friendly’ stickers make it easy for those businesses welcoming dogs in the town centre to be clearly seen.

BBA spokeswoman Caroline Stone says the association supports the trial.

“We need to wait and see how the trial goes but we support the trial as bylaws need to be revisited on a regular basis as the world changes.

“We’re really happy with the support from CBD businesses.

“We’ve had nothing but positive feedback on the sticker initiative – and the feedback from the National Dog Show competitors via Facebook has been awesome too,” she says.

Trial rules state that all dogs must be on a leash and under control.

Owners must clean up after their dogs. Failure to do so could result in a $300 fine.

 

Black Hawk 2019 National Dog Show

National Breed Show – Wed 2 to Sat 5 Oct, Stadium 2000
Obedience Show – Thu 3 to Sat 5 Oct, Convention Centre
Agility Comp – Sat 5 – Sun 6 Oct, Rewi Murray Polo Grounds

Renwick School students Lily Ball and Reece Glennie. Photo: Matt Brown.

Young scientists’ generous gesture

A short stay in the hospital inspired two young entrepreneurs to donate money from their science fair project towards toys for Wairau Hospital.

Renwick School students Reece Glennie and Lily Ball devised an ant repellent for the Marlborough Lines Science & Technology Celebration that worked so well it “shocked” the young scientists.

The two pupils from room 19 followed the scientific method for their first individual science fair project, experimenting on troublesome ants coming in through the window of their classroom.

“There were a lot of ants in the classroom and at home,” 11-year-old Lily says.

They experimented with apple cider vinegar, lavender and lemon juice, using honey as a control.

“Many ants came for the honey,” Reece, 10, says.

They collated the data and had mixed results with the various ingredients but came upon the winning formula when they mixed the ingredients together.

“We were shocked,” Reece says.

“It made every single ant go.”

The two students were so happy with their product, they started selling jars of the eco-friendly ant repellent, with the goal to buy new toys for the Wairau Hospital.

They raised $24.

“We bought heaps of toys and gave them to the Wairau hospital,” Reece says.

“We have learnt to solve problems and we got together as a team and it worked really well,” he says.

The year six students received a silver award for their project.

Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Hope after company collapse

A young Blenheim couple who faced losing their first home after the collapse of a building business has been thrown a lifeline.

Anastasia Brown and Caleb Mischeski faced losing $50,000 after a now-defunct Blenheim building company was placed into liquidation.

But other businesses have since stepped up to help those burnt by the collapse of Marlborough company Rose Built Homes last week.

Peter Ray Homes have taken on Anastasia Brown’s build on Blenheim’s Taylor Pass Road, which has languished for more than three months.

Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.
Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Peter Ray Homes director Donna Lee says their builders are working at a reduced margin to get her into the house.

“We really want to help Anastasia out,” Donna says.

RBH Limited, trading as Rose Built Homes, was placed into liquidation on 5 September.

It has since come to light the company’s two directors, Kyle Payne and Ryan Butler operated a web of interconnected companies.

Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.
Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.

The pair, who are no longer in contact with each other, have since fled town, leaving some Marlborough businesses out of pocket by at least $1.4million.

More than 40 businesses and subcontractors have come forward to date are worried staff and family members.

A source says the company’s troubles were clear to those in the building industry.

For Anastasia, who put money given to her by her grandparents towards the $338,000 home, says the first sign of trouble was when scaffolding was pulled down.

The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roofs and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.
The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roof and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.

A skip on-site was then emptied on where the couple’s front lawn was going as bills weren’t paid.

“Every week I asked when the roof was coming on, and every week they would say Friday.

“I found out from the plumber, they just vanished, I got incredibly stressed about it so my parents took over,” she says.

“The liquidator cancelled their contract with us. It’s pretty shitty, but I was lucky to find Donna from Peter Ray Homes.”

In January, Butler and Payne transferred 90 per cent of the shares of RBH to a holding company, NOA Development Group Limited.

NOA was removed from the companies register in July.

One unsecured creditor, who didn’t want to be named, says alarm bells for him started ringing in June.

“RBH was charging $2-300sqm cheaper than everyone else but were $16,700 a week in the red.

“It’s bad management.”

Anderson Architectural Design owner Jason Anderson says Ryan and Kyle were not “cut out to run a business.”

“They’re the type of guys you could have a beer with,” he says. “They just weren’t cut out to run a business.”

Jason says there were seven Rose Built Homes houses under construction and another person who had paid a deposit when the company folded.

Former project manager Graeme Andrews resigned from the company six weeks ago after a year with the company.

He says while he is not owned any money, he was “a little bit uncomfortable.”

“I was concerned I maybe wasn’t getting the right information. I had suspicions, but I had no idea.

“All I can say is I don’t have the full picture or the full information.

“Everyone in town knew there were issues.

The reason I did stick around was for the tradies…and for the clients, a lot of which were young couples. I felt for them.”

 

Butler and Payne affiliated companies:

 

Maddison Group Limited – Trading name: Tru Cut Property services

Industry Classification(s): N731340 Property maintenance service (own account)

Registered from 2 May 2017 to 22 Aug 2019

Kyle Payne owns 100% of 2 shares

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne. Ashleigh Broughton was a director until 3 April 2019.

 

3rd Gen Homes Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered from 18 August 2016 – in process of being removed from register for being overdue in its obligation to file an annual return.

Ryan Butler owns 100% of 100 shares.

Carl Ross Butler ceased being a director: 01/12/2016 – but the paperwork to remove him as a director was filed July 2019

Directors: Ryan Butler.

 

RBH Limited

Industry Classification(s):

In Liquidation

Registered from 18 July 2017 to 05 September 2019

NOA Development Group Limited owns 90% of 100 shares (90).

Ross Stuart Butler (Ryan’s dad) owns 10% of 100 shares (10).

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

Rose Built Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered on 16 January 2019 – current

NOA Development Group Limited owns 100% of 200 shares.

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

NOA Development Group Limited

Industry Classification(s): E321120 Land development or subdivision (excluding construction)

Registered from 3 August 2018 to 17 July 2019.

Ryan Butler owns 50% of 100 shares.

Kyle Payne owns 50% of 100 shares.