Kathryn Martin, former Silver Fern Yvonne Willering and Claire Martin at a fan event in Liverpool last year. Photo: Supplied.

Netball nut wins big

A love of the game has seen a self-confessed netball nut net a prize for two to the next world cup in South Africa.

Claire Martin from Blenheim scooped a package for two to the Netball World Cup 2023 in Cape Town.

The huge netball fan is bringing her mum with her for the once in a lifetime trip.

Claire impressed International Netball Foundation with her tie-breaking skills to win the competition.

“I’m very stoked, and so is mum.

“They emailed me at the beginning of August. I couldn’t believe it – I thought it was a joke.

“I was going to go anyway, although I have no idea how I was going to get the money.

“It’s perfect for a netball nut like me.”

Claire, who has just moved to Lower Hutt where she works for a payroll company, went to the World Cup in Liverpool last year.

“It’s a bit of a tradition, now – I went to the Sydney World Cup four years prior,” she says.

After returning from Liverpool, Claire says she wanted to support the federation’s charity, Creating Choices.

It was her $10 donation that ultimately led to her big win.

“There was a box on the form – you could enter a competition – it was just 15 words about what netball means to you.

“I choose netball because it has given me the confidence to take challenges head-on and grab rare opportunities,” she wrote.

“I never thought I would win.”

The prize includes return flights, four-star hotel accommodation and two tickets for the duration of the competition.

“I was in complete shock and it’s taken a while to process the fact I’ve won such an incredible prize.

The first person I called was my mum; the who, how and why to my love of netball and the one that will be joining me on this experience of a lifetime.”

“I can’t wait for Cape Town 2023.”

Bohally school brainboxes Oliver Wakelin and Ted Small. Photo: Matt Brown.

Brainy Bohally boys’ TV quiz quest

Two young brainboxes are taking their quizzing skills to the small screen.

Bohally school pupils Ted Small and Oliver Wakelin will stretch their thinking abilities in upcoming episodes of popular TV2 children’s quiz show Brain Busters.

But don’t ask them how they went, they’re not allowed to say.

“It’s an awesome experience. At first, I was really nervous. Once I started getting the questions right, I was okay,” Oliver says.

The year 8 student filmed at the Christchurch studio about a month ago – his episode is scheduled to air next Wednesday.

Ted says he can’t wait to make the trip to Whitebait Media’s filming space, tomorrow (Wednesday) with one of his parents.

“I’m not super nervous. The fact I even got on the show is pretty good,” he says.

It’s not easy to make the cut – the selection process to compete in the quiz is tough.”

The two students are both in Bohally’s FPSG – Future Problem Solving Group – and they say the entry quiz, used to determine a student’s suitability, is on the “harder side”.

“If they think you did well enough on the quiz, you get an audition,” Oliver says.

Studio executives then gave the young quizzers a Skype or Zoom call.

“They asked our name and interests and had us complete some practice questions,” Ted says.

The new quiz show challenges year eight and nine students through various rounds of  quiz questions with the final two contestants racing on an obstacle course.

“The quiz is only half the show,” Oliver says.

The first round, with all four contestants, test their general knowledge. Then they pick a specialist subject – Oliver’s was history and Ted’s, mathematics.

“I was worried I was going to do really bad, that I was going to bomb out,” Oliver says.

He says it depends how the questions fall, especially with pop culture – pointing out that he wasn’t born when Friends first aired on television.

“A guy on my show was asked a question about Shortland Street – none of us had any idea,” he laughs.

Then comes the physical challenge – a course with puzzles, ziplines, obstacles and a race to the finish.

Finally, the winner from the obstacle course gets the opportunity to win money in a final quick-fire question round.

“You get $100 regardless, and you can earn more if you make it to the final round,” Oliver says.

Ted says he’s aiming for the number one spot and isn’t sure what he will spend his prize money on.

“It’s cool all the effort that goes into it,” he says.

Oliver’s looking to invest in metal detecting tools.

“It’s the best quiz show – mainly because I’ve been on it.”

Bohally Intermediate School acting principal Nicky Cameron-Dunn. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Warning over online abuse

A Marlborough principal is warning parents to be on their guard when it comes to social media as staff grapple with increasing fallout.

Bohally Intermediate School staff have sent out an email to parents highlighting the harm social media can cause.

Acting principal Nicky Cameron-Dunn says she has seen a rise in the number of social media related issues students are dealing with.

Nicky says her personal advice is for no students to use social media platforms until they are 14 years old.

“It’s much more of an issue now than ever before and it’s only going to get worse.

“My personal advice would be for no students to use social media platforms at this age but ultimately it is up to parents to decide that for their own child.”

Using social media outside of school is having a flow on effect at school, says Nicky.

All mobile phones must be handed in to the school office at the start of the school day.

The school also uses blocking devices to help keep pupils safe.

But what they are accessing at home is spilling over at school, Nicky warns.

“They come into school and are emotionally upset, have anxiety and do not feel valued.

“Using these platforms to destroy others and spread rumours is inappropriate and they’re too young to understand the ramifications and reflect on what they’ve done.”

The school also sent out a link to parents to go to for advice.

But social media savvy children are going to great lengths to keep their online activities off the parental radar.

“We know that students often have numerous accounts yet may only show one to their parents which looks okay,” Nicky says.

Monitoring social media use is key to ensuring it is only used positively, she says.

The minimum signup age for Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter and YouTube is 13.

Net safe NZ say a child’s social and emotional capability is still developing and they will find it difficult to identify and deal with challenges.

“If your child is under 13 and keen to use social media, consider their capability to manage potential online challenges before setting up a profile.

For more advice about staying safe online visit  https://www.netsafe.org.nz/

  • A third of New Zealand teens (33%) spend 4 or more hours online in an average day.
  • 4 in 10 currently use 5 or more social media platforms. • 1 in 4 would be devastated if they had no access to digital technologies for a month.
  • Nearly 8 in 10 agree “there are a lot of things on the internet that are good for people my age”.
  • There are gender differences in teens’ use of digital devices, the activities they carry out online, and their preferences for specific social media platforms.
  • Teens regard themselves as confident technology users. Over 4 in 10 rarely or never seek support regarding an online or technical problem
  • Overall, teens highly rate their knowledge of online safety, but over 1 in 10 (13%) do not know much about it.
  • Just over half (56%) agree it is helpful to set age restrictions and block access to content.
Amy Cragg, Marianne Govaerts, Anne Goodyear, and Emily Gidlow are supporting Breast Cancer Foundation New Zealand. Photo: Supplied.

Picton Pink Ribbon Fundraiser takes glam to the next level

A Pink Ribbon Breakfast in Picton is taking glam to the next level in a bid to raise money for the Breast Cancer Foundation of New Zealand.

Oxley’s Bar & Kitchen is hosting their first annual Pink Ribbon Breakfast Event on Sunday 6 September 6 from 10am to 1pm.

Organisers hope guest host and popular Sydney-based drag queen Miss Felicity Frockaccino will help get ticket sales soaring for a cause that is close to their hearts.

One hundred percent of the proceeds will be donated to the Breast Cancer Foundation of New Zealand.

Business owner, Amy Cragg is contributing the venue, staff, and entertainment and says local support has been overwhelming.

“Every business we have approached to contribute has said yes, without hesitation.

“Ticket sales alone will raise $5,000, and we have some fantastic auction items which could double that figure.

“The highest valued item so far is an original artwork by Liz Kempton, which usually goes for around $1,400,” she says.

Oncologist nurse Karen Little-John from Wairau Hospital is one of two guest speakers.

She will share her perspective on treating cancer patients.  What to look out for and what support is available locally.

Second guest speaker is Waikawa Marae manager Allanah Burgess, who will outline their services, including community support.

Funds raised for the Breast Cancer Foundation go towards educating the public about breast cancer (which is New Zealand’s most common cancer in women), support those diagnosed with the disease, medical grants, and distributing money for breast cancer research.

The breakfast will be held on Sunday, 6th August 10am – 1pm.

Tickets are $50 each (100 max) and can purchase at Oxley’s Bar & Kitchen.

Children at Blenheim’s Montessori Preschool spread sunshine and smiles as they helped celebrate Daffodil Day. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Flower power

Staff and children donned yellow for the day to help raise funds for the Cancer Society on Friday.

School across Blenheim joined in the national appeal as the annual street appeal was postponed because of Alert Level 2.

“We spent a lot of time discussing how the daffodil is a symbol of hope and what it stands for, says teacher Rachel Roundhill.

Olivia Doonan and Niamh Doherty are hoping people will donate money to help Osgood family. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Great lengths for charity

Going for the chop for a good cause has seen two long-haired ladies lose their lengthy locks.

Niamh Doherty and Olivia Doonan have donated their hair to Freedom Wigs help make wigs for cancer patients.

And the pair are hoping the move will also raise money for Blenheim girl Zoe Osgood who is undergoing treatment for bone cancer in Christchurch.

Both have links to the Osgood family and wanted to help.

Niamh, 12, met Zoe at a school camp and Olivia turned to Zoe’s mum Michelle for advice when she started The Station in Seddon.

Michelle is the manager at the Wine Station in Blenheim but was happy to help.

“She’s always been amazing. She gave me as much information as possible and was totally welcoming,” Olivia says.

Hair by Kardos owner Donna Tupouto’a and manager Debbie Jensen cut 14 inches of hair off before getting it ready to send off by courier.

This is the second time that Niamh has cut her hair off to donate to Freedom Wigs.

She first did it at 8 years old and decided straight away she would grow it again to donate.

“It’s a bit nerve wracking, but exciting,” she says.

Olivia says she only trimmed her hair and had not had a cut properly in 9 years when she decided to help.

“It kept moulting and I was like, no, I need as much on as possible. I want to raise as much as I can for #Zoestrong.”

Zoe has been undergoing chemotherapy which has so far failed to shrink the tumour and she is now scheduled for surgery.

Donations can be made through ASB account: 12-3126-0707216-00, with all money going to the Osgood family.

Members of the Marlborough Amateur Radio Club, Bill Cousins Stuart Watchman, Graeme McKay and Ian Conway. Photo: Supplied.

Radio group make waves at local lighthouse

Amateur radio fans in Marlborough have been making new connections across the world while shining a light on a famous local landmark.

Members of the Marlborough Amateur Radio Club spent the night at the base of Cape Campbell Lighthouse last weekend as part of International Lighthouse and Lightship Weekend.

The team took all their ham radio gear with their them and set up in a historic cottage at the foot of the lighthouse which featured in the 2016 hit movie Light Between Oceans.

Former New Zealand Association of Radio Transmitters president Stuart Watchman from Blenheim says they were the only group to take part this year.

“Normally there would be other groups around NZ doing the same thing.

“There are about five light houses in total, many are hard to get to, but due to COVID we were the only group that participated this year.”

The annual event is held on the third full weekend in August where radio groups operate from lighthouses across the world.

“We enjoy talking to other people via radio in all sorts of ways during this weekend, direct to radio amateurs around the world using short wave. Direct meaning no internet or cell towers, wireless all the way,” Stuart says.

“It’s also fun to go to interesting places and play with radios.”

The group set up temporary aerials on the beach and contacted other amateurs in Australia, United States, New Zealand, Japan Belgium.

The Marlborough group hold a general meeting on the second Thursday of the month at EOC 4 Wither Road at 7.30pm and a social group meeting on the third Thursday of each month.

Email [email protected] for further information.

Fairhall Cemetery is one of several which will see the cost of burial plots double over the next five years. Photo: Chloe Ranford/LDR.

Burial law revamp could prove costly

Paula Hulburt and Chloe Ranford

 

A revamp to burial laws could see council bosses forced to hike up fees if forced to take on extra responsibilities.

Marlborough Council could be let counting the cost of any changes to the 56-year-old Burial and Cremation Act, costs which would be passed to the public.

But council are pushing back against extra responsibilities which could see costs climb again.

The move comes just 15-months after a price increase which came into effect on July 1 this year.

Council manages eight cemeteries across Marlborough at Ward (Flaxbourne), Seddon (Awatere), Omaka, Fairhall, Tua Marina, Picton, Havelock and Rai Valley.

Burial fees range from $2145 for a natural burial at Fairhall Cemetery to $981 for an adult burial interment and $193 for ashes to be interred

A Law Commission report says the Burial and Cremation Act is outdated and recommended a raft of changes.

It put forward 127 recommendations to modernise the law that governs death, burial, cremation and funerals in New Zealand.

Changes could see council take on the responsibility for maintaining headstones and monuments which could also raise legal questions about who owned what.

This would come at a “significant cost” to the council, with the “only option” being to increase cemetery fees or rates.

“The council already deals with a number of family conflict issues with cemetery plots and while on the one hand it can be said, ‘we are used to it,’ the reality is that every case is distressing where this occurs,” its submission says.

The council also opposed a suggestion that councils should be the ones to decide whether a family could dig up a body or ashes from a burial place for the same reasons.

It also did not want to become tangled in family disputes.

This was also the case for a new rule which, if approved, could see the council expand its eight cemeteries to include separate burial sections for military personnel or groups of people with common requirements, it said.

Submissions on the act close on 31 October at 5pm.

Dogs may become a common sight in Blenheim’s town centre. Brodie, Maisie and Hadley MacDonald with Kip. Photo: Matt Brown.

Barking up the right street

Dogs could be allowed in Blenheim’s town centre after council loosens the leash on a blanket ban.

At a meeting of council’s Environment Committee this morning, a review of the region’s Dog Control Policy and Bylaw was approved.

Now the public will get the chance to have their say.

Council have approved the appointment of a subcommittee to hear opinions on the review, headed up by councillor Jamie Arbuckle.

It’s important to recognise the role that digs play in peoples’ lives, Jamie says.

“We want to ensure that our bylaw is up to date and fit for purpose.

“The council recognises the positive role that dogs play in the lives of their owners and the community, but we need input from dog owners and the general public.”

Councillors Barbara Faulls, Thelma Sowman and Nadine Taylor will also sit on the review committee.

If it gets the final go-ahead, the bylaw will allow leashed, under control dogs into the CBD.

Councillors are also recommending that the restricted area around playground areas increases from 3 to 10 metres.

But Blenheim’s Pollard Park and Ward Beach will remain off limit to pet pooches.

The public consultation period will begin on Friday 18 September and will run for six weeks, before closing at 5.00 pm on Monday 9 November.

Hearings are scheduled to take place in early December where members of the public will have the opportunity to speak to their submission.

The Sub-Committee will then review all submissions and make their final assessment before presenting the proposed policy and bylaw amendments to the Environment Committee. Once adopted by the Environment Committee, the policy and bylaw will be presented to the full Council for final adoption early next year.

All dog owners will receive a letter advising them of the policy and bylaw review and how to make a submission should they wish to.

Council is required to review the policy and bylaw every 10 years. The last review was completed in 2012.

Today’s decision is subject to ratification by the full Council on Thursday 17 September.

Cellist Elgee Leung rehearses with other members of Marlborough Civic Orchestra ahead of Saturday’s performance. Photo: Simon Clark.

Show will go on

The show will go on for Marlborough Civic Orchestra who will take to the stage on Saturday.

Following Prime Minister Jacinda Adern’s announcement on Monday that alert levels would stay the same, the orchestra have been quick to act.

Now numbers will be limited in line with government guidelines at the ASB Theatre on 29 August.

The orchestra have been rehearsing the repertoire for this concert for most of the year after they had to postpone during lockdown.

The orchestra, featuring world renowned cellist Elgee Leung, will be conducted by Anthony Ferner, principle flute for the Christchurch Symphony orchestra.

ASB Theatre spokeswoman says the 7pm show will go ahead.

“The show will definitely be going ahead. Pending last minute arrangements to accommodate restrictions, there may be another afternoon performance.”

Tickets are still available at $35 for adults and $10 for children.

For any queries regarding ticket sales and show arrangements contact the ASB Theatre on 520 8558.