Marlborough Chamber of Commerce chief executive Hans Neilson and Marlborough Media director Summa MacDonald. Photo: Andrew Board.

Shop & Win competition puts $5k up for grabs

One lucky Marlburian will win $5000 cash thanks to a new local promotion, Shop & Win.

Shop & Win is a joint promotion between 30 local retailers, Marlborough Weekly and the Marlborough Chamber of Commerce and will see a total of $6000 given to locals.

The competition is simple, buy anything at one of the 30 participating businesses between 22 October and 29 November, fill in an entry form and you’re in the draw.

After six weeks one winning entry form will be pulled from the pile and the name on that entry will win $5000 cash.

There are also second and third prizes of $750 and $250 respectively.

Marlborough Weekly co-owner Summa MacDonald says the competition encourages people to shop locally.

“We have so many fantastic retailers here in Marlborough and this competition is a way to encourage people to support them and go in the draw to win a massive prize,” Summa says.

“It’s such a cool way to get the town buzzing and it’s so simple for people to take part.

“We encourage everyone to fill in a form when you shop because there will be a local winner.”

Chamber of Commerce chief executive Hans Neilson says when you buy local your dollars kick off a multiplier effect.

“Spending your money at independent businesses begins a cycle in which those businesses then spend their money at local shops, support community groups and employ locals.”

Hans says small local businesses are the “economic backbone” of Marlborough.

“Many don’t have large marketing budgets so this offers a resource to raise their profile by being a part of something bigger, something that supports Marlborough as a whole,” he says.

“This is a great campaign and we’re proud to support it.

“It’s a gift to your community, and with Marlborough Anniversary coming what better way to say happy birthday.”

A full list of the participating businesses is on page 9 of this newspaper, or keep an eye out for the Shop & Win posters in the windows of participating businesses. A full list is also on the Marlborough App.

Wairau River winemaker Same rose and viticulturist Hamish Rose toasting to their Champion Sauvignon Blanc. Photo: Supplied.

Wine win for Marlborough family

A pioneering family of winemakers has seen off competition from thousands to see one of its wines come out on top.

Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2019 has taken the Champion Sauvignon Blanc title at the 2019 New World Wine Awards.

In its 17th year, the awards attracted 1274 entries from 176 wineries across New Zealand and overseas.

Seventeen independent wine experts took part in a blind taste test with only varietal, vintage and country of origin noted.

The Wairau River Sauvignon Blanc 2019 comes from the Rose Family Estate vineyards located in the Wairau Valley,

Winemakers Sam Rose and Nick Entwistle and viticulturalist Hamish Rose are extremely proud of the wine.

Sam says he believes the 2019 growing season and harvest contributed to the wines outstanding quality.

“The warm and fine weather through the late summer months allowed the development of a riper spectrum of tropical flavours, providing us with excellent blending components to create our Sauvignon Blanc” he says.

Volunteers spent four hours picking 6kgs of gorse flowers. Photo: Supplied.

Gin fuels record gorse harvest

A key ingredient in a Marlborough-made gin is helping keep a notorious weed at bay.

Record hauls of gorse flower have been gathered at a community harvest event.

Six kilogrammes of the yellow flower were handpicked over four hours.

Twice a year, the team behind Marlborough’s new Elemental Distillery organise a local foraging event.

In a bid to entice people to pick the problem plant, which causes misery to hay fever sufferers every spring, Elemental Distillers co-owner Ben Leggett puts on a free BBQ.

But Ben himself is a big fan of the plant.

“I simply love it. Not only is it both aromatic, herbaceous and fruity but it’s somewhat of an anti-establishment botanical in a market already full of rogue exotic species.

“The only issue remaining is how to harvest it in peak flowering and in volumes enough to last until the following season,” he says.

The answer came in the form of eight off-road vehicles, one gourmet barbeque put on by Francis Nolan from Boom Chef, a large pine plantation, local volunteers and some very thick gloves.

Introduced around the early 19th century as a hedgerow for livestock by European settlers, gorse flourished in New Zealand’s temperate climate flowering twice a year compared to just once in the Northern Hemisphere.

Gorse also generates exploding seed pods which can travel over 6 metres from the parent plant and can lay dormant in soil for up to 50 years before sprouting.

Ben says thanks to a collaboration with Marlborough 4WD Club, 15 local volunteers headed up into Marlborough’s Kaituna Hills last month aiming for a 300-meter-high plateau located in Stoney Creek forestry.

“Without the support by Marlborough locals, we would never have been able to deliver a fresh botanical gin like that of Roots,” Ben says.

Project coordinator Alec McNeil is overseeing a nationwide initiative which could see people paid to recycle. Photo: Matt Brown.

Cash for trash

Marlborough could help lead the way in a national bid to help boost recycling levels.

The council’s solid waste manager Alec McNeil will oversee a pioneering project which could see people paid to drop off empty drink containers.

And he believes Marlburians will be quick to take up the initiative.

“Marlborough is used to source separation of recycling so the possibility of a future Container Recycle Scheme (CRS) should complement and add to our existing approach,” he says.

Council's solid waste manager Alec McNeil believes Marlburians will be quick to take up the initiative. Photo: Matt Brown.
Council’s solid waste manager Alec McNeil believes Marlburians will be quick to take up the initiative. Photo: Matt Brown.

Under the scheme, which was unveiled last week, plastic, glass and aluminium drink containers will carry a refundable deposit, potentially between 5-20 cents each.

Helping people cash in on their empties could be key to boosting recycling levels.

Alec says he believes any initiative would rely on being readily available.

“A key focus of the design will be ensuring equity of service provision across NZ that affords all communities the opportunity to engage with the system,” he says.

“At a more strategic level a CRS changes the way we think about containers by reintroducing a value back into the material”.

Marlborough and Auckland councils will carry out the project design together following a government funding boost of almost $1 million.

Alec, who is project coordinator and deputy spokesman is a trustee on the Agrecovery Foundation Trust Board.

He says the scheme will help keeps useful resources out of landfills and has the potential to create new jobs.

The two councils will work with the Ministry for the Environment and others including the beverage, packaging and recycling industries, councils, retailers, charitable organisations, Māori and consumer representatives.

The application was initiated from involvement with the National Resource Recovery Group (NRR).

The NRR was convened by the Ministry for the Environment to consider a response to the recycling challenges facing NZ.

“In lieu of the contraction of markets particularly post the ‘National Sword’ policy implemented by China,” Alec says.

China has introduced strict rules around importing solid wastes as raw materials. The policy bans various plastic, paper and solid waste.

Alec says a CRS scheme would impact on material flow.

“Auckland and Marlborough councils offered to submit an application to the waste minimisation fund to facilitate a working group that would design a CRS for NZ.“

A final design is due to be presented to the Government by August 2020 and rolled out in 2022.

Café Herb and Olive owner Richard Barton with 10-year-old fox terrier Pepe. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Paws clause gives dog-friendly businesses mark of approval

Dog-friendly businesses are set to get the paws-up, displaying special stickers where pooches are welcome.

For the first time in decades, dogs are allowed in Blenheim’s town centre from Tuesday as a bylaw banning them is lifted for a month.

And a specially made paw print sticker will go up in businesses around town where pooches are permitted.

For Richard Barton from café Herb & Olive, allowing dogs in with customers was an easy decision to make.

“I have no problem with dogs being outside,” he says.

The 65th Black Hawk National Dog Show gets underway in Blenheim between 2 and 5 October.

With up to 1200 dogs expected at the event, the by law will be lifted for the whole month.

The Blenheim Business Association (BBA) have organised the stickers which feature a black paw print with a heart in it.

These ‘dog friendly’ stickers make it easy for those businesses welcoming dogs in the town centre to be clearly seen.

BBA spokeswoman Caroline Stone says the association supports the trial.

“We need to wait and see how the trial goes but we support the trial as bylaws need to be revisited on a regular basis as the world changes.

“We’re really happy with the support from CBD businesses.

“We’ve had nothing but positive feedback on the sticker initiative – and the feedback from the National Dog Show competitors via Facebook has been awesome too,” she says.

Trial rules state that all dogs must be on a leash and under control.

Owners must clean up after their dogs. Failure to do so could result in a $300 fine.

 

Black Hawk 2019 National Dog Show

National Breed Show – Wed 2 to Sat 5 Oct, Stadium 2000
Obedience Show – Thu 3 to Sat 5 Oct, Convention Centre
Agility Comp – Sat 5 – Sun 6 Oct, Rewi Murray Polo Grounds

Chateau Marlborough chief executive officer Brent Marshall and general manager Lynley McKinnon. Photo: Matt Brown.

Double win celebrations for hotel

A Marlborough hotel has been awarded back-to-back wins at a prestigious Australasian hotel competition.

Chateau Marlborough won the HM Australasian Hotel of the Year for Best NZ Regional Hotel for the second year running, one of only two hotels to achieve the award twice and in their second year of attending the ceremony.

General manager Lynley McKinnon says winning the award was very much a team effort.

“We’ve got a dedicated team of staff that is striving for excellence, which makes the success fantastic for the hotel,” she says.

The 2019 HM Awards for Hotel and Accommodation Excellence, now in their 17th year, are the leading industry in Australia, New Zealand and the South Pacific.

More than 900 people attended the awards dinner at the Sydney’s International Convention Centre last Friday and over 60 awards were handed out across 48 categories.

Chief executive officer Brent Marshall says to be the second hotel in 17 years to win the award in consecutive years was a “very pleasing surprise”.

“We were up against 15 others of an exceedingly high standard, to be announced as the winner was satisfying and humbling at the same time,” Brent says.

“There has been a lot of continual work to wh? And improve.

“It’s great for the Marlborough region to be acknowledged as a province that offers a quality experience.

“The awards are a reflection of the staff, from the manager down.”

Lynley was a finalist in the NZ General Manager of the Year category and executive chef James Sievewright was a finalist for the Australasian Hotel Chef of the Year.

The judging panel was made up of industry leaders and travel writers from the Australasian region.

HM editor-in-chief and chief judge of the HM Awards James Wilkinson says the calibre of this year’s entries were the best in the event’s history.

“The quality of entries in the HM Awards this year was unlike anything we have seen before. It was a challenge to even choose the finalists from up to 80 entries in some cases, let alone decide on a winner and highly commended,” James says.

“To even be a finalist this year was a massive effort and many of our winners have also been employee of the year or hotel of the year in their own organisations, so it was an incredibly strong field of entries in 2019.”

Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Hope after company collapse

A young Blenheim couple who faced losing their first home after the collapse of a building business has been thrown a lifeline.

Anastasia Brown and Caleb Mischeski faced losing $50,000 after a now-defunct Blenheim building company was placed into liquidation.

But other businesses have since stepped up to help those burnt by the collapse of Marlborough company Rose Built Homes last week.

Peter Ray Homes have taken on Anastasia Brown’s build on Blenheim’s Taylor Pass Road, which has languished for more than three months.

Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.
Rose Built Homes office in the Blenheim CBD. Photo: Matt Brown.

Peter Ray Homes director Donna Lee says their builders are working at a reduced margin to get her into the house.

“We really want to help Anastasia out,” Donna says.

RBH Limited, trading as Rose Built Homes, was placed into liquidation on 5 September.

It has since come to light the company’s two directors, Kyle Payne and Ryan Butler operated a web of interconnected companies.

Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.
Peter Ray Homes has come to the rescue of the young couple after the now-defunct building company Rose Built Homes went under. Photo: Matt Brown.

The pair, who are no longer in contact with each other, have since fled town, leaving some Marlborough businesses out of pocket by at least $1.4million.

More than 40 businesses and subcontractors have come forward to date are worried staff and family members.

A source says the company’s troubles were clear to those in the building industry.

For Anastasia, who put money given to her by her grandparents towards the $338,000 home, says the first sign of trouble was when scaffolding was pulled down.

The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roofs and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.
The house, on Taylor Pass Road, has sat for months with no roof and no activity. Photo: Matt Brown.

A skip on-site was then emptied on where the couple’s front lawn was going as bills weren’t paid.

“Every week I asked when the roof was coming on, and every week they would say Friday.

“I found out from the plumber, they just vanished, I got incredibly stressed about it so my parents took over,” she says.

“The liquidator cancelled their contract with us. It’s pretty shitty, but I was lucky to find Donna from Peter Ray Homes.”

In January, Butler and Payne transferred 90 per cent of the shares of RBH to a holding company, NOA Development Group Limited.

NOA was removed from the companies register in July.

One unsecured creditor, who didn’t want to be named, says alarm bells for him started ringing in June.

“RBH was charging $2-300sqm cheaper than everyone else but were $16,700 a week in the red.

“It’s bad management.”

Anderson Architectural Design owner Jason Anderson says Ryan and Kyle were not “cut out to run a business.”

“They’re the type of guys you could have a beer with,” he says. “They just weren’t cut out to run a business.”

Jason says there were seven Rose Built Homes houses under construction and another person who had paid a deposit when the company folded.

Former project manager Graeme Andrews resigned from the company six weeks ago after a year with the company.

He says while he is not owned any money, he was “a little bit uncomfortable.”

“I was concerned I maybe wasn’t getting the right information. I had suspicions, but I had no idea.

“All I can say is I don’t have the full picture or the full information.

“Everyone in town knew there were issues.

The reason I did stick around was for the tradies…and for the clients, a lot of which were young couples. I felt for them.”

 

Butler and Payne affiliated companies:

 

Maddison Group Limited – Trading name: Tru Cut Property services

Industry Classification(s): N731340 Property maintenance service (own account)

Registered from 2 May 2017 to 22 Aug 2019

Kyle Payne owns 100% of 2 shares

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne. Ashleigh Broughton was a director until 3 April 2019.

 

3rd Gen Homes Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered from 18 August 2016 – in process of being removed from register for being overdue in its obligation to file an annual return.

Ryan Butler owns 100% of 100 shares.

Carl Ross Butler ceased being a director: 01/12/2016 – but the paperwork to remove him as a director was filed July 2019

Directors: Ryan Butler.

 

RBH Limited

Industry Classification(s):

In Liquidation

Registered from 18 July 2017 to 05 September 2019

NOA Development Group Limited owns 90% of 100 shares (90).

Ross Stuart Butler (Ryan’s dad) owns 10% of 100 shares (10).

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

Rose Built Limited

Industry Classification(s): E301120 Building, house construction

Registered on 16 January 2019 – current

NOA Development Group Limited owns 100% of 200 shares.

Directors: Ryan Butler and Kyle Payne.

 

NOA Development Group Limited

Industry Classification(s): E321120 Land development or subdivision (excluding construction)

Registered from 3 August 2018 to 17 July 2019.

Ryan Butler owns 50% of 100 shares.

Kyle Payne owns 50% of 100 shares.

Nelson Marlborough Health chief executive Peter Bramley and Tasman Rugby Union’s commercial and marketing manager Les Edwards celebrate their recent health partnership. Photo: Sara Hollyman.

Aiming to kick sugar for touch

In a first for New Zealand rugby, the region’s health board has signed up with the Tasman union to become its official health and wellbeing partner.

Nelson Marlborough Health (NMH) has replaced the union’s former partner, Coca Cola Powerade, and will see the Mako players promote health initiatives.

As part of the three-year, $15,000 deal, the Tasman Rugby Union will encourage positive health-related decisions and behaviour among its stadium audiences, club rugby communities and schools.

Its focus will be on the reduction of sugar consumption, the promotion of smoke free environments, alcohol harm reduction and promoting metal wellbeing and resilience.

NMH chief executive Peter Bramley says the partnership as an “innovative and powerful” public health initiative.

“As the official health and wellbeing partner of the Tasman Rugby Union, we can leverage the influence that Mako players have among youngsters in our region. We can also the reach the TRU has into clubs, schools and the wider community, to inspire positive health decisions and behaviour.”

He says the sponsorship is a “prudent investment”, even amid revelations that the health board is in a $20 million deficit.

“It costs as much as $5000 to remove one child’s teeth under general anaesthetic and we are seeing far too many children needing this kind of unnecessary hospital care in our region.

“The terrible health effects of sugary drinks don’t stop at teeth – sugary drinks are the cause of obesity, diabetes and other serious health conditions that are a heavy burden on every DHB’s finances.”

Tasman Rugby Union chief executive Tony Lewis says that promoting healthier living to its player base is important to them individually and as players in an active competitive sport.

“As a union we are excited to be working progressively with NMH over three years to achieve our collective goal of encouraging our players to reduce their sugar intake and to be mentally and physically healthier.”

NMH health promotion manager Lauren Ensor says being sponsored by Coca Cola seemed to be “inappropriate” because surgery drinks were the main cause of sugar in New Zealander’s diets.

“We aim to see an increasing health focus within rugby locally over the coming years and hopefully that inspires other unions and New Zealand Rugby to follow suit.”

Steve Badham has big plans for his new restaurant and café. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

New restaurant ready for lift off

An aviation-themed restaurant that faced a few turbulent few years has been bought by new owners.

The former Argosy Restaurant building in Woodbourne will become The Runway and feature an aviation-themed café and a separate restaurant open in the evening.

New owners Steve Badham and partner Lisa Stove hope to open the doors to the new-look business in October.

“I’m moderately excited but a bit anxious too. I love to cook and many of my clients are in the hospitality industry, but I’ve never run a restaurant before.

“I’ve driven past the building every week for 20 years going to and from Nelson.

“I never thought I’d own it,” he says.

The businessman who runs his own commercial IT solutions company says the restaurant will feature mainly Indian and European cuisine.

He would also like to make the most of the Argosy ZK-SAE, owned by Paul Davidson, which sits next door.

“Later on, we intend to landscape a garden area under the plane for outside dining.

“It would be good to make it more of a feature,” he says.

The Argosy ZK-SAE, once owned by Safe Air, carried both travellers and freight.

It hit headlines all over the world in 1978 after two pilots reported they were followed by unidentified flying objects as they flew of the Kaikoura coast.

Steve says while the café and small convenience store he hopes to install alongside would take on an aviation theme, the newly renovated restaurant would not.

“It will have an ancient temple theme and will feature art and antique furniture.

“This may well be for sale, but I’m still trying to piece it all together at this point and am not ruling anything out at this stage.”

The former boat builder has used his skills to do a lot of the renovation work himself, including the new curved counters.

“I want every car that goes past to soon have a reason to stop and come in,” he says.

“I always swore I’d never want to go into a kitchen, but I have a passion for food and couldn’t let the opportunity pass.”

Marlborough designer Hayley Rhind will debut her new designs at New Zealand Fashion Week. Photo: Supplied.

Designer’s lifestyle makeover leads to catwalk debut

A bid to look after her own health will see a Marlborough mum make her design debut at New Zealand Fashion Week.

Hayley Rhind is part of the force behind acclaimed million-dollar fashion label White Chalk.

Now her own athleisure label will hit the catwalk on Auckland after she was invited to show her collection as part of fashion week at the end of the month.

The entrepreneur began in the fashion business by creating her own clothes when designer brands would blow her budget.

But Hayley says the busier she became, the more her lifestyle suffered.

She hopes her new range, RHIND, will encourage more Kiwi women to incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

“After I launched White Chalk in 2015, I became so busy and my lifestyle suffered.

“When I decided to focus on my own health and exercise, I realised I was wearing activewear more than anything else, so it was just natural that I wanted to create my own range,” she says.

The self-taught fashion guru lives on a 1000ha sheep and cattle farm in Marlborough.

“My sister-in-law, Ginny, was living in Vietnam at the time so I had her produce them (clothes) for me,” explains Hayley.

“When all of our friends started asking if they could buy our pieces, we realised we were on to a good thing.”

The pair have since brought their manufacturing home to Blenheim to match their vision of having fashion brands that are 100 percent designed and produced locally.

“People deserve to know where their clothes come from. Buying locally guarantees this.

“Our customers also get a kick out of supporting people in their own backyard.”

Hayley says RHIND has been 12 months in the making and will include leggings, jumpers, crops, t-shirts, singlets, sports bras and rain jackets.

“I want to inspire women to love their bodies in the form of movement and nourishment,” Hayley says.

“I aim to encourage women to move more and see their bodies in a positive light.”