Corey Hebberd. Photo: Supplied.

Rangitāne supports iwi business

Rangitāne o Wairau has launched a special fund to help support people and businesses suffering hardship in the wake of COVID-19.

After delivery more than 300 emergency food and hygiene packs during lockdown, iwi are now helping with the recovery process.

Rangitāne Investments Limited commercial property manager Corey Hebberd says times are tough for everyone.

“We know that doing business is tough right now.

“Our commercial arm, like all businesses, is feeling the effects of COVID-19.

“Now more than ever, we need to focus on supporting local – and, where we can, supporting our own whānau enterprises.”

New oranga fund Te Kura Ora has been set up to help support whānau who need one-off financial support.

Plans for a directory of whānau businesses have also been bought forward in a bid to help.

The Directory, Rārangi Pakihi o Rangitāne, was published on Thursday on the Rangitāne o Wairau website.

It’s about helping, says Corey.

“This message is about the next steps that we are taking to support whānau, particularly those who own a small business.

“Both the Iwi Trust and our Iwi Investment Company contract and employ services via small businesses in our community to deliver our work programme.

“Not only are we sharing details with our wider whānau and iwi on their services, but we’ll also be engaging and contracting them where we’re able to.”

Email [email protected] to register on the Rangitāne Business Directory.

If you need support contact the office on (03) 578 6180.

Cuddon freeze dry sales and marketing manager Blair Kibblewhite with Lara, who’s destined for America. Photo: Matt Brown.

Firm’s overseas odyssey

Lara has been lovingly bundled up and prepared for her several-thousand-kilometre boat trip to North America for a new life making pet food.

Usually, a Blenheim engineer would be ready to welcome her after her six-week trip to help get her settled and comfortable in her new home.

But COVID put paid to that, so Lara, a $2 million plus, general-purpose freeze-dryer made by engineering firm Cuddon will be making the trip alone.

And the Blenheim based team are making the most of modern technology to oversee Lara’s installation remotely from the other side of the world.

Cuddon freeze dry sales and marketing manager Blair Kibblewhite says they had to think outside the box to get the large machines overseas and installed.

“Previously, we would send an engineer to unpack and facilitate the install,” Blair says.

“Now, we’re doing this in Canada at the moment, the owner has a camera on his head and we’re talking him through the process remotely.

Cuddon Engineering, on Mcartney Street. Photo: Matt Brown.

“We’ve achieved a lot utilising that technology,” Blair says.

Closed borders due to the pandemic continue to hurt exporters.

But Cuddon Engineering is bucking the trend, and while bosses have had to rethink some ways of doing things exports are going strong.

The engineering company works in refrigeration, water engineering, irrigation and carbon steel but their big earner is designing, building and installing freeze driers.

Most of the other branches worked through lockdown as essential services, but the freeze-drying section couldn’t do anything due to health and safety reasons.

“We find the guys may have put things on hold, but the sales are still coming. We haven’t stopped at all.”

He says two freeze dryers are leaving the workshop, one bound for the US and other, the UK.

“We thought and worked outside the box,” he says.

Working remotely via Zoom, up to four engineers in Blenheim can pop on a call to run the engineers onsite through the installation process.

Then there are a few more working with contractors.

“It’s face to face and stable – it’s better than phone.

“It’s given us the ability and confidence to do it again with this one going to the US.”

Health woes force resignation

Poor health has forced a long-serving Marlborough Trust committee member to resign.

Marlborough Electric Power Trust has revealed trustee Malcolm Aitken is standing down at the end of the month.

The former air force employee will be replaced by unsuccessful candidate, Cathie Bell, who was the highest-polling candidate not elected to the board.

Trust chairman Ian Martella says Malcolm’s contributed over the past few years has been valuable.

Marlborough Electric Power Trust has revealed trustee Malcolm Aitken is standing down at the end of the month. Photo: Supplied.

“Malcolm has been on the trust since September 2014, and we have really valued his input.

“He is a long-time Marlburian, moving here in 1960 with the air force, and then running a highly-successful restaurant business for 22 years, as well as being part of many community organisations.”

Malcolm Aitken was re-elected to the trust in the election held in February 2020.

Ian says Malcom had resigned because of health reasons and that the Trust wishes him all the best.

Cathie Bell is a communications specialist, having worked in journalism, public relations, and in local and central government roles.

She now owns her own communications business.

“Cathie has followed the trust’s work actively, attending all our public meetings and asking questions and we look forward to welcoming her to the team”.

The Marlborough Electric Power Trust holds all the shares of lines company Marlborough Lines and administers them on behalf of the power users of Marlborough.

Meeting chair Niel Sowry takes feedback from worried Clubs of Marlborough members. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Future of social club in jeopardy

Potential bankruptcy and claims of bullying are threatening the survival of one of Marlborough’s oldest clubs.

The running of the Clubs of Marlborough has come under fire from anxious members who fear for its future.

About 140 people packed into the Redwoodtown Community Hall on Sunday to voice their concerns and discuss a way forward.

Members say they have been kept in the dark by a non-communicative committee and fear the struggling club may go under.

President Jason Clouston, who alongside other committee members was invited to the meeting but did not attend, came under fire for alleged bullying tactics.

Meeting chair Niel Sowry warned the crowd to be careful to stick to facts as Clouston had threatened legal action over anything libelous.

“Anyone that wants to talk, I have to advise you to be very careful that what you say is factual and can be proven.

“Social media has been alive with comments, a lot of them we cannot substantiate.

“There has been a threat of legal action if anything libelous is said, so please be careful if you want to say something.”

The move comes after sweeping plans to restructure the Club were announced earlier this month, with staff facing redundancy.

Concerned members say they did not understand why the Club had not reopened under level 2.

Sowry says the Club received wage subsidy payments for 56 staff members over lockdown.

Official documentation from the wage subsidy website shows the club received $356,000.

Members have earlier written a letter to the committee calling for a vote of no confidence in Clouston and an extraordinary general meeting.

No meeting has yet taken place.

“We could wait two years and still not see a meeting so the issue of confidence or non-confidence in anyone on committee is not addressed,” Sowry says.

“You want to do something, you’ve got to do it according to the rules, and the rules are deficient.”

Sowry told the crowd he was working with Clubs New Zealand and legal representation in Wellington.

“We have a president who tries to rule by fear and intimidation.

“It appears to be that he’s a bully when it comes to staff, and anyone that wants to stand up and oppose him, they get the treatment.

Tina Beattie says she stood for the committee and served but was forced to resigned because of bullying.

She claims the bullying had continued after she resigned.

A Committee of six were voted by members to approach the committee and get lines of communication going.

Members say the club needed a new committee to ensure it thrived.

Jason Clouston says they have advised by our Solicitors to refrain from commenting on issues arising from the Clubs restructuring process which is currently ongoing.

“Members will be notified shortly on the time and date of the Extraordinary General Meeting requisitioned by the Sowrys.”

In a statement, RSA president Chris Bamber asked members to bear with them through this difficult time.

“It is a stressful time for all concerned in the Clubs of Marlborough restructure process.

“I know it is hard for our members not knowing what is happening, hearing all the rumours, out there but please bear with us for a little longer and know we are working our hardest at getting our Club back to a stage where we can all enjoy our Clubs’ facilities and activities again.”

Marlborough Girls’ College students Beth Gray, Destiny Aires and Vita Elworthy. Photo: Matt Brown.

Business students’ wake up call

Students needing a good night’s sleep have sparked a business idea for a team of college entrepreneurs.

Four Marlborough Girls’ College business students have created special sprays to help people relax at night and feel refreshed in the morning.

Their new company, Mellow, is fully funded by the team who hope their new venture will get the money coming in.

The team settled on the facial sprays after their market research revealed many of their peers often felt tired or rundown.

Mellow chief executive Destiny Aires says the facial sprays weren’t the group’s first business idea.

Butter sticks, dog biscuits and reselling secondhand clothing were all ideas left on the cutting room floor, she says.

“We came up with a few ideas before we settled on Mellow. We had to think of a problem or an issue and then solve it.

“One of the sprays calms your mind and relaxes you. The other reinvigorates you and wakes you up in the morning.”

Production and communications manager Vita Elworthy says expert help was invaluable to get the sprays to trial stage.

Vita says the team made the most of their business mentor Erena Oliver’s knowledge of essential oils.

“She explained the properties of the oils and we made our own recipe based on that,” Vita says.

“We had a few prototypes – the first one didn’t smell too nice. We had to make it appeal to people – to make it smell nice and make people want to put it on.

“It applies to everyone, but we’re targeting youth.”

Destiny, who’s aiming to be a hotel manager, says business studies and the practical experience was really useful.

Finance director Beth Gray says the project has been exciting.

“It’s fun having full control, from the logo to the packaging,” she says.

“We’ve all contributed ideas.

“It would be cool to keep it going.”

Beth and Vita are looking to take a more creative route in their future – but both agreed the business experience was an eye-opener.

“Alongside tiredness and not getting enough sleep – it won’t lead to breakouts,” Vita says.

“It’s made for sensitive skin,” Destiny adds.

The young entrepreneurs will soon take up a stall at the Sunday Farmers’ Market with the sleep sprays retailing at $12.99.

Our tagline is ‘the natural way’, Destiny says.

Niel and Margaret Sowry have garnered support for an extraordinary general meeting. Photo: Summa MacDonald.

Stricken Clubs of Marlborough set to reopen soon

Bosses at Clubs of Marlborough have revealed it will open for business again soon.

The central Blenheim business has not yet reopened following the lifting of lockdown restrictions to level 1.

Committee members have thrown their support behind the club’s beleaguered president, Jason Clouston.

Some financial members have called for an extraordinary general meeting, citing a vote of no confidence in the president, citing concerns over mismanagement.

In a statement released last week, the Committee of Management says the club cannot survive without immediate changes.

Staff stand to lose their jobs in the wake of proposed chnages.

“The Clubs of Marlborough has been through challenging times in the past few months.

“An operational review concluded immediate changes were needed for the club’s survival. These cannot be achieved under the club’s present structure

“In the ever-changing hospitality environment, with declining revenues and returns, we need to make changes that will prepare the club for the financial challenges ahead that all New Zealand businesses will face,” the statement says.

The hospitality business has never achieved the profitability forecast in 2007, when the clubs first moved into the multi-million-dollar complex.

The Clubs of Marlborough brought the Returned and Services Association, the Blenheim Workingmen’s Club and the Marlborough Club under one roof in 2007.

The large complex has a gym, shooting range, gaming hall, TAB facilities and two restaurants – and shares the space with the Marlborough Convention Centre downstairs.

Management say Covid-19 struck just as the restructuring process began.

“When we reached Level 2 the government-imposed restrictions of 100 persons per building made it financially unviable for the Club to reopen.

“Our objective is that following restructuring job security will be provided.

It is acknowledged that the process has been difficult for all those involved,” management says.

Redundancies are set to be announced next week as the proposed restructure is revealed.

“While there are likely to be job losses, they are necessary if the club is to survive.

“At all times, the President and Committee have acted in the best interests of members and staff alike.

“Members will appreciate the constraints imposed upon the President and Committee due to the current employment issues involved.”

The clubs are set to open again next Monday, 22 June, at 10am, with a limited service on offer while the new menu and bar service is developed.

“It is a new beginning that we hope our members and staff will embrace. We have a superb facility that we want better utilised by our members,” say bosses.

Blenheim woman Margaret Sowry, who alongside husband Niel has gathered support for a vote of non-confidence in Jason Clouston, says she has not heard anything official from the committee.

Allan and Janet Udy are changing the way wool is bought and sold. Photo: Matt Brown.

Shear genius

A computer software company is helping keep one of the country’s oldest industries alive.

Blenheim-based software development company Golden Micro Solutions Ltd is helping give New Zealand’s wool market a modern twist.

Wool brokers and buyers are using an online platform created by husband and wife team Allan and Janet Udy.

And the move has helped strengthen the industry in the face of threats like COVID-19.

An online sale held last week was the first time independent wool brokers have used the system, breaking with over 150 years of open cry auction tradition.

Wool Online and Golden Micro Solutions Ltd co-director Janet Udy says the pandemic meant people couldn’t travel to Napier or Christchurch for the traditional auctions.

“The Covid-19 crisis has made everyone realise that there can be situations when it’s simply not feasible or desirable for brokers and buyers to travel.

“Level 3 and 4 lock-downs forced the cancellation of the traditional open-cry auctions in Napier and Christchurch, and this has helped focus the industry’s collective mind on the idea of increasing the volume of wool traded online.

The Wool Online system, a joint venture alongside Canterbury-based wool broker Wool Connextions Ltd, uses technology originally developed for Wool Marketing Nelson Marlborough in Blenheim in 1995.

A new auction mechanism has been added that more closely mimics the way an open cry auction works.

Developers used it as the foundation to build the new online sales software which was used at an auction in Napier last week.

After an initial glitch, the programme quickly proved its worth, says Janet.

“A technical issue in the first few minutes of the sale resulted in it being reset and restarted, but thereafter the auction proceeded well with more than half a dozen of New Zealand’s major wool buyers purchasing lots.”

Ryan Cosgrove, a buyer from John Marshall & Co Ltd, one of New Zealand’s wool exporters, says he was pleased with the way this week’s auction went.

“With the additional support of more brokers, merchants and buyers this certainly has the potential to be a staple method of sale in the exchange of wool in New Zealand.

“We hope that widespread adoption will help reduce costs while maintaining the same price discovery and transparency for growers, with the same efficiency for buyers, as open-cry auctions do.”

Koromiko Honey owners Matt and Catherine Wells. Photo: Matt Brown.

Goodbye cheese, hello bees

A 102-year-old building is being given a new lease of life by a couple determined to honour its historic past.

On a small road in Koromiko sits a white building, its rather nondescript exterior gives little hint of its colourful past.

The buzz of bees drowns out the distant highway and colourful hives dot the front lawn.

Once the home of Koromiko Cheese, now the century-old building houses sticky sweet honey and hordes of bees.

Now in the process of a loving restoration by Koromiko Honey owners, Matt and Catherine Wells extracted honey for the first time at the factory and say they’re on the “brink of greatness”.

“We’re on the brink of greatness – well, on the brink of something,” Catherine says.

The building was a jewellery studio, an engineering firm, a plastic extrusion plant and a seafood processing plant throughout its 100 years.

But when Matt and Catherine moved in – it was nothing but a “concrete bunker”.

“We’re bringing it back to life,” Matt says.

The dairy co-op in the early days. Photo: Supplied.
The dairy co-op in the early days. Photo: Supplied.

“It’s probably a 20-year project.”

The couple bought the property from Picton man Kevin Cooper – he acquired the property in the mid 80’s.

“He liked to invest and help people out,” Matt says.

“He was a gorgeous person that gathered people up and helped them,” Catherine added.

“Everyone in Picton seems to know him.”

Matt says the factory was decommissioned from cheese in 1985.

“It wasn’t up to scratch,” he says.

“It closed down and moved to Tua Marina.”

The couple set up Urban Bees, leasing hives to townies in Blenheim and Nelson. It was the first programme of its kind in New Zealand.

“In the first year we had 40 sites in Blenheim and another 40 in Nelson,” Matt says.

Matt took a beekeeper course when he was a teenager.

But he says it didn’t pay the mortgage.

“I got a trade – bought a house – then beekeeping got more popular.

“Now, bees have boomed,” he says.

Matt says he wants to keep his operation small – and the “iconic” building is part of their plan.

“It’s iconic, this place.”

Koromiko Cheese lives on in Marlborough legend, if not fridges.

Puro managing director Tim Aldridge. Photo: Supplied.

Medical cannabis company to grow job market

Marlborough’s fledgling marijuana industry could inject millions of dollars and hundreds of jobs into the region in its first year.

Bosses at Medical cannabis firm Puro have revealed growing the crop could bring in about $60 million dollars in the next two years.

It could also create more than 300 jobs once established, with the first intake set to start in October.

Puro managing director Tim Aldridge says the business will also create other jobs as it gets underway.

“Puro has the capacity to create in excess of 300 jobs once our long-term facilities are up and running, most of these will be at Kaikoura site.

“On top of this are the indirect jobs and construction employment that our infrastructure and development project will create,” he says.

Puro ran a successful crowd-funding campaign last year, raising $4million to establish the medicinal cannabis operation.

The company intends to grow medicinal cannabis in greenhouses in the Waihopai Valley and high-CBD (cannabidiol) hemp in Kekerengu, on the coast between Blenheim and Kaikōura.

“We estimate that over 95 per cent of our total product will contain no THC, 0.3 per cent or lower,” Tim says.

THC is the psychoactive compound of cannabis that is used to create a high.

“Our focus is towards CDB and other medically beneficial cannabinoids.”

The large, outdoor facility in Kaikoura is where most of our new jobs will be created, Tim says.

“Here we will have cultivation technicians that will work under supervision in roles based around plant sowing, harvesting, pruning and pest management.

“There will be supervisors overseeing these roles and specialists to work alongside them – plant pathologists, compost experts etc.

“These roles will be most suited for horticultural trained postgraduate students, or others with similar qualification and commercial experience,” he says.

The Kaikoura processing area will also have technicians for bucking, trimming, milling, and drying of the hemp flower.

“Following the processing, we will have roles for packaging and distribution to third party manufacturers.

“Our outdoor cultivation will come online in September with some workforce required prior to planting.

There will be multiple roles in the laboratory, research and cultivation divisions including cannabis horticulture, process management, compliance and packaging created at the indoor Waihopai glasshouses.

“We are ready to start planning as soon as our commercial cultivation license is received from the Ministry of Health, which is currently pending.”

“This is a multi-million-dollar economic boost for Marlborough and Kaikoura and our success will encourage other local businesses to entire this exciting and profitable market.”

Kaikoura MP Stuart Smith is backing the business, saying it brings with it the chance for Marlborough to make its mark on the world stage as a cannabis producer.

“I understand the value in utilising our precious farmland for economic purposes, with the goal to better both the local and national community,” he says.

“…there is now an opportunity to bring a new land-based industry to Marlborough with the potential to cement Marlborough’s place on the world stage as a premium producer of medical cannabis products.”

Smiths City in Blenheim may not be included in the sale agreement. File photo.

Anxious wait for Smith City staff as closures loom

Staff at one of Blenheim’s biggest stores face an anxious wait to find out if they still have jobs.

Smiths City bosses yesterday revealed they had negotiated a conditional $60 million sale.

But seven of the 29 stores nationwide will shut after being ditched from the sale agreement, with around 165 of the 465-strong workforce set to lose their jobs.

The fate of the Blenheim store is expected to be made public on Friday, with no official word on whether it was included in the buyout.

The store was open for business as usual over the weekend.

Founder of refrigerated logistics company Big Chill, Coiln Neal, has agreed the conditional sale under the banner of Polar Capital.

Smiths City Chair Alastair Kerr says the shock move will hopefully help the nationwide store stay afloat in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.

“As we signalled at the end of March and earlier this month, the Covid-19 pandemic has delivered a material and significant shock to the business,” he says.

The final number of stores to be sold is dependent on the lease transfers and new lease terms being agreed for those transferring stores, a spokesman says.

In addition to acquiring the stores Polar Capital has also committed to taking on some of company’s debt and liabilities.

The final amount expected to be received is $8 million.

Alastair says the move will help save some jobs.

“This shock has substantially shortened the time available for the turnaround programme that was the cornerstone of the company’s strategic plan.

“Faced with this shorter timeframe, it became clear that Smiths City needed to bring new capital into the business to drive the turnaround.

“However, it has now become clear that the transaction we have announced offers the greatest opportunity for Smiths City to endure for the long term.

“It also offers the greatest opportunity to protect the jobs of as many of our staff as we can in this uncertain time,” he says.

Polar Capital’s Colin Neal says the firm is a trusted brand and all commitments to customers will be honoured.

“If a customer has paid Smiths City for a product, they will get the product.

“I am looking forward to working with the Smiths City team to build on this proud legacy.

“I am also grateful for the resilience and continuing loyalty they and the broader community of partners, have shown as we worked through this period of uncertainty.”