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Hunt on for families with historic ship links

Karen McLeod hopes to uncover families with links to the Edwin Fox. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

The search is on for families connected to an historic ship – some of whom may have no idea about their lofty links.

There are more than 1000 names on the list of immigrants, crew and convicts who arrived in New Zealand on the Edwin Fox.

As the date for a special event for descendants draws closer, Edwin Fox Maritime Museum manager Karen McLeod hopes to uncover more connections.

“There are at least 100 people registered for the muster, but it would great to get more along.

“I’d like to find some of the people who don’t realise they’re connected; get people thinking that maybe they’re related,” she says.

The Edwin Fox is the only surviving ship that transported convicts to Australia, and the reunion for the ship’s descendants is planned for October 25, 16 and 27.

Edwin Fox Maritime Museum manager Karen McLeod hopes to uncover more connections. Photo: Paula Hulburt.
The ninth oldest preserved ship in the world, the Edwin Fox is a popular visitor attraction. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Karen says at a recent talk she attended in Auckland, a descendant family introduced themselves.

“A lot of people know if they have descendants but there will be people out there who don’t and it would be great to find them,” she says.

Built on the Ganges in 1853, The Edwin Fox, which is in sry dock in Picton, was later chartered by the Shaw Savill Company to carry immigrants to New Zealand from England in 1873.

The ninth oldest preserved ship in the world, the Edwin Fox is a popular visitor attraction.

“We’ve just had one of our best years ever in terms of visitor numbers with around 11,200 people through.

“Word is getting out,” says Karen.

“We had passengers from all over the UK, Ireland, Scotland, lots from Cornwall.

“We also thought it would be a good time to enquire if anyone has any old relics of the Edwin Fox Ship, not necessarily to give back but so we can keep track of where they might be for the future.”

Edwin Fox Maritime Museum manager Karen McLeod hopes to uncover more connections. Photo: Paula Hulburt.
Edwin Fox Maritime Museum manager Karen McLeod hopes to uncover more connections. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Key names connected to the Edwin Fox: Hurford, Prince, Hunt, Friel, Prince, Ongley, Heberley,  Keegan, Manning, Wilcock, Curnow, Hocking, Dundas, Rowe (from Cornwall ) Huzziff, Neazor, Pask, Power, Kerr, Thomas (from Cornwall) , Carroll (they were destined for Auckland), Cannon, Forder, Morgan,, Bailey, Bates, Lomasney, Legge, Jemmett, Brunsdon or Brunsden, Lloyd, Mapey from Glamorgan, Trestrain, Windosen, Cheeseman, Dobbie, Doddy, Dooley,  Dunn, Kelbow, Killcher kingerlee, Oki, Quarterman, Knigge, Aylward Shea, Le Neury, Scalfi, Topp, Whenbaw, Cushelly, Eaves,  Molison,Teehan, William Black (captain) Wealleavers, Woolford Burgoyne, Wilson, Yeo,  Gschnell (Austria destined for New Plymouth), and Treverrow.

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