Business, Community

Goodbye cheese, hello bees

Koromiko Honey owners Matt and Catherine Wells. Photo: Matt Brown.

A 102-year-old building is being given a new lease of life by a couple determined to honour its historic past.

On a small road in Koromiko sits a white building, its rather nondescript exterior gives little hint of its colourful past.

The buzz of bees drowns out the distant highway and colourful hives dot the front lawn.

Once the home of Koromiko Cheese, now the century-old building houses sticky sweet honey and hordes of bees.

Now in the process of a loving restoration by Koromiko Honey owners, Matt and Catherine Wells extracted honey for the first time at the factory and say they’re on the “brink of greatness”.

“We’re on the brink of greatness – well, on the brink of something,” Catherine says.

The building was a jewellery studio, an engineering firm, a plastic extrusion plant and a seafood processing plant throughout its 100 years.

But when Matt and Catherine moved in – it was nothing but a “concrete bunker”.

“We’re bringing it back to life,” Matt says.

The dairy co-op in the early days. Photo: Supplied.
The dairy co-op in the early days. Photo: Supplied.

“It’s probably a 20-year project.”

The couple bought the property from Picton man Kevin Cooper – he acquired the property in the mid 80’s.

“He liked to invest and help people out,” Matt says.

“He was a gorgeous person that gathered people up and helped them,” Catherine added.

“Everyone in Picton seems to know him.”

Matt says the factory was decommissioned from cheese in 1985.

“It wasn’t up to scratch,” he says.

“It closed down and moved to Tua Marina.”

The couple set up Urban Bees, leasing hives to townies in Blenheim and Nelson. It was the first programme of its kind in New Zealand.

“In the first year we had 40 sites in Blenheim and another 40 in Nelson,” Matt says.

Matt took a beekeeper course when he was a teenager.

But he says it didn’t pay the mortgage.

“I got a trade – bought a house – then beekeeping got more popular.

“Now, bees have boomed,” he says.

Matt says he wants to keep his operation small – and the “iconic” building is part of their plan.

“It’s iconic, this place.”

Koromiko Cheese lives on in Marlborough legend, if not fridges.

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