Movie marathon for film makers

Marlborough movie makers will put their talents to the test as they team up to take on a mammoth timed task.

Supported by Screen Marlborough, filmmakers have just 48 hours to create a short film from scratch.

Titled 48Hours, the competition is New Zealand’s largest independent filmmaking competition.

And Blenheim run film organisation Random Directions are gearing up to pit their wits against other groups across the country.

Chris Lippiatt will be helping the team on Friday night as they get a concept and script together.

I’m a five-year veteran of 48hours and am stoked to be part of the Random Directions Team.

“I hope to see some skills shared, inspiration nurtured and one crazy ass movie getting made.”

The competition is now in its 19th year and entrants don’t know what genre (thriller/romance etc.) they will be shooting until the start of the competition.

All creativity: writing, shooting, editing and adding a musical soundtrack, must occur within the 48Hour window beginning Friday 5 March at 7 pm and ending Sunday 7 March at 7 pm.

“Whether you are a professional production company, a group of hobbyists, a school group or two friends with a smart phone you can enter, have fun and get your movie seen,” says Chris.

48hours team leader, and co-creator at Random Directions, Phil McKinnon says the team have a lot of creativity.

“This is right up our alley, the Random Directions Film Project we created is similar to 48hours, but on a much smaller scale, so we should have a pretty solid team of creative filmmakers and outside the box thinkers and its fantastic to have the support of Screen Marlborough behind us.”

In 2018 the Council entered into a three-year partnership with Screen Wellington to promote Marlborough as a screen destination.

Screen Marlborough also supports the development of Marlborough based talent and expertise in various aspects of filmmaking.

“Our team is made up of a dozen Marlburians who have a passion for filmmaking and fun.” adds Phil. “We have a lot of creativity and talent here in Blenheim and this is one way to be able to show that off.”

The Random Directions Film Festival will be in August and be held at Event Cinema in Blenheim.

Follow the Teams 48hour Journey on facebook @RandomDirectionsNZ

Eden Kavanagh is looking forward to a brighter future. Photo: Sarah Brown.

Singer hits high note

A Marlborough singer who won a legion of fans across the world with a TV audition is set to end the year on a high note.

Blenheim girl Eden Kavanagh,26, wowed audiences with her blind audition on smash-hit British show The Voice but judges were less impressed.

Now the songstress is performing full time and has been booked as part of the New Year’s Eve line up at Picton’s popular New Year’s Eve party.

She will also be one of the supporting acts performing at the Summer Sounds Music festival with Bic Runga at the Queen Charlotte Tavern in Linkwater.

Being able to perform again is a big relief, says Eden, who gave up singing for a while after appearing on the hit talent quest.

“I was heartbroken. I’d put my heart and soul into it. I just wanted my mum and to come home and here felt like home,” she explains.

“I didn’t even want to sing for a while afterwards. I couldn’t.”

Born in Rangiora, Eden has divided her time between Ireland and New Zealand.

Back in Blenheim for 18 months, her confidence has returned and requests for bookings have been keeping her busy.

She has been lucky enough to pursue her singing dream full time after giving up her day job in the hospitality industry last month, she says.

“I’m rapt to be home and delighted to be doing New Year’s Eve in Picton. I remember being on the foreshore one year in the crowds; the vibe was great, and I knew I wanted to be the one singing one day.

The self-confessed ‘super perfectionist’ reveals that after lockdown people started looking to enjoy themselves.

“People are looking to have some fun now. I knew that after level one people were going to want to go out, have a good time and be entertained,” she says.

For the Whiteria graduate who has a BA in Performing Arts, it is the realisation of a lot of hard work.

Without the support of her family and friends she knows it would have been much harder.

“They have been amazing,” she says.

“I was a little hustler from a young age and when I was a kid, I used to create whole performances and, without telling my parents, gave tickets to the neighbours and charged 50 pence at the door.

“I don’t get nervous performing, it’s kind of like I have an alter ego and can literally walk out in front of 100,000 people no problem.

“It’s crazy as I’m so comfortable. I find it calming and think that comes from being well-rehearsed.”

For bookings contact [email protected] or @edenkavanaghmusic on social.

Aaron and Isaac Piper from Cloudy Bay Clams are helping raise money for charity with a giant paella. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

All in good taste for charity

Charity begins at home for local businesses keen to help cook up a storm for charity.

Cloudy Bay Clams will be creating a massive paella to sell at Bayley’s Friday Night Feast.

All proceeds from food sold from their stall on the night will be donated to Kids Can and the Life Education Trust.

When owners and operators Isaac and Kerry Piper put word out about what they were doing, a bevy of businesses quickly jumped on board to help.

The response has been humbling, Isaac says.

“This is about good people coming together as a collective under the Cloudy Bay Clams umbrella and giving back to the local community.

“There’s a lot going on in the world right now and we want to focus on the community, do something good.”

The giant paella will use about 40kg of clams and be created by Christchurch restaurant owner and chef Javier Garcia, who is donating his time and skills for free.

Owner of the Curator’s House, he has also lent the huge dish on which the traditional Spanish dish will be cooked.

Cloudy Bay Wines are kindly sponsoring Jack’s Raw Bar, says business development manager Aaron Piper who will be at the event to help shuck clams.

Bayley’s Friday Night gets underway this Friday in Blenheim town centre from 3.30pm until 8.30pm.

The popular family-friendly event will feature a range of local businesses and chefs as well as live music.

“Anybody Cloudy Bay Clans reached to and asked if they wanted to be involved said ‘Totally. What can we do to help?’”

“The response has been humbling,” Aaron says.

“What’s really exciting is that everyone wants to be involved.

‘It’s a great community here and the support has been amazing.

Cloudy Bay Clams and Jack’s Raw Bar will be set up in the forum on the night.

One hundred percent of all money made on the night will go to charity.

Businesses who have contributed with time, expertise and ingredients are:

  • Curators House
  • Boom Town Beer
  • Origin South
  • Boom Town Chef
  • Karaka Cuisine
  • Marlborough Tour Company
  • Imagine Signs
  • Saffron Marlborough
  • Mills Bay Mussels
  • Chateau Marlborough
  • Imagine Signs
  • Cloudy Bay Wines
  • Ora King Salmon
The iconic festival attracts wine makers from across the region. File photo.

Wine and food fest falls foul of Covid fears

Marlborough Wine & Food Festival has been cancelled for the first time in its 36-year history.

Festival bosses have today announced the iconic festival will not go ahead as planned to help protect the 2021 harvest from the threat of Covid-19.

Marlborough Winegrowers Board Chair Tom Trolove says the decision has been a difficult one.

“It’s been a really tough decision, and we realise this will impact businesses in our community.

“But the board was clear that in these unprecedented times, it had to prioritise the safety of the harvest.

“The Marlborough Wine & Food Festival celebrates our industry on the cusp of our harvest, and that’s a risk,” he says.

A report from the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research found that the wine industry made up 19 per cent of Marlborough’s GDP.

The industry employs 4,850 people in Marlborough and could not be put at risk Tom says.

“This industry is absolutely vital to Marlborough’s economic health.

“So, no matter how much we love our iconic wine festival, with all its camaraderie and celebration, we cannot let it jeopardise our industry, or indeed our community.”

“Deciding early to cancel the festival was important for event partners, festival organiser Wine Marlborough, and also the event audience, many of whom travel from other parts of the country to attend,” he says.

Around 8000 people celebrate at the annual festival each year at Brancott Estate.

But worries about Covid-19 means organisers have had to pull the plug.

“The past month has been a reminder that the world is in a time of uncertainty, and New Zealand’s situation can change at any time.

“What is certain to us is that we have to do all we can to protect the health of our people, and the economic lifeblood of this region,” Tom says.

Marlborough’s wine industry makes up 77.7 per cent of the national grape harvest, and accounts for at least 80 per cent of all exports, which are currently worth $1.923 billion a year.

General admission tickets were due to go on sale on October 1, which also made an early decision important.

“It may not be a good time for 8000 people to gather on a vineyard site to celebrate together with over 40 wineries, but it’s a fantastic time to visit Marlborough’s cellar doors and get an extraordinary insight into what makes this region’s wines amazing,” Tom says.

Super Early Bird ticket holders will be offered a 100 per cent refund.

Marlborough Mayor John Leggett says the cancellation would be a blow to Marlborough’s events calendar,

“But there’s no doubt that the wine industry’s main objective is to harvest its grapes in optimal condition and make the wine that helps put Marlborough on the global stage”.

Festival Committee Chair Tracy Johnston says the committee was disappointed the event was not going ahead but believed it is the right decision.

“The Marlborough Wine & Food Festival will return as a proud and iconic event for Marlborough when it can be delivered without putting our industry and community at risk.”

Wine Marlborough General Manager Marcus Pickens says the committee and organising team put their heart and soul into the event every year.

“It’s gutting that we can’t do that for February 2021, but we fully support the board’s decision.”

“Wine Marlborough’s top priority is protecting the reputation of our extraordinary wine region, and right now that means doing all we can to help reduce the risk of holding a large event like this before harvest.”

Cellist Elgee Leung rehearses with other members of Marlborough Civic Orchestra ahead of Saturday’s performance. Photo: Simon Clark.

Show will go on

The show will go on for Marlborough Civic Orchestra who will take to the stage on Saturday.

Following Prime Minister Jacinda Adern’s announcement on Monday that alert levels would stay the same, the orchestra have been quick to act.

Now numbers will be limited in line with government guidelines at the ASB Theatre on 29 August.

The orchestra have been rehearsing the repertoire for this concert for most of the year after they had to postpone during lockdown.

The orchestra, featuring world renowned cellist Elgee Leung, will be conducted by Anthony Ferner, principle flute for the Christchurch Symphony orchestra.

ASB Theatre spokeswoman says the 7pm show will go ahead.

“The show will definitely be going ahead. Pending last minute arrangements to accommodate restrictions, there may be another afternoon performance.”

Tickets are still available at $35 for adults and $10 for children.

For any queries regarding ticket sales and show arrangements contact the ASB Theatre on 520 8558.

Random Directions film festival organiser Phil McKinnon. Photo: Matt Brown.

Film makers set for silver screen

A new film festival will soon hit Marlborough’s silver screens.

But the awards and certificates have been left on the cutting room floor – this purely local tournament is purely for the love of film.

Random Directions organiser and self-confessed cinephile Phil McKinnon says his festival is all about the movies; there’s no judgement, no pressure, and no politics allowed.

“It’s all about showcasing films and embracing anyone that wants to be involved in film in Marlborough,” he says.

“We want to keep it in the Marlborough community.”

Fifteen filmmakers will be showing off their hard work at Event Cinemas, in Blenheim, at the end of the month.

Phil says the playlist is a “combo” of films created in the first two years of the Random Directions group.

“Covid kind of got us behind,” he says.

“Next year, in September, we’ll show the films from our third year.

“The longest [film] is about 13 minutes. Most are around the four to five-minute mark,” Phil says.

He says a lot of planning and preparation go into films – even short ones.

“You have to rely on your crew.

“It’s always a whole lot of chaos and you have to manage the chaos as well as you can.”

“Movies – it’s what I love. Making them, watching them. Working at a cinema is one of the only jobs I’ve ever wanted to do.

“Now it’s all Netflix. It’s convenient but I miss checking out film covers at the video store.

He hopes the screening will attract new members to the group.

“People can get scared to get involved because they think they’ll have to be on screen.

“But there’s so much going on behind the scenes; sound, post-production, even catering.

“There’s heaps of different aspects.”

Film makers of all ages, from 16 years old to 50 plus will be showcasing their work.

All the proceeds from the short-film screening go toward cinema hire, and Phil says any extra money made he wants to put back into the local filmmaking community.

“We’re also looking at getting into scholarships, to encourage training in Marlborough.”

The “Marlborough-based film festival, Marlborough-made, for Marlburians” screens August 30 at Event Cinemas in Blenheim, from 7.30pm.

Tickets are available on Eventfinda.co.nz and cost $15 plus booking fee.

“Come buy a ticket and support local,” Phil says.

“It’s just Marlborough filmmakers – unless, of course, Taika calls. Then we’d make an exception.”

Former Sony Music Executive Paul Ellis is returning to Marlborough to set the stage for an annual music festival. Photo: Supplied.

The sound of music

From Cyndi Lauper to Sarah McLachlan etc he’s worked with some of the biggest names in music.

Former Sony Music executive, New Zealand Idol and NZ Got Talent judge Paul Ellis is back home in Marlborough.

And he has his sights set on bringing more top music talent to the township of Linkwater- making the Summer Sounds concerts an annual event.

While Paul says he can’t divulge any artist names yet, he can reveal they’ve one of the acts has had had four number 1 albums.

“It’s all under contract”, he says.

Swapping the big city of Auckland for the small rural township, the former Queen Charlotte Sounds man is excited to be back, organising the Summer Sounds gigs.

Supporting long-time friends and Queen Charlotte Tavern owners Mary-Ann Surridge and Jane Tito, Paul has been hitting up his contacts.

He’s also on the lookout for some local support music talent to support on the day.

“I have been away from Marlborough on and off for a long period, but I am keen to hear of any top of the south acts, let me know,” he says.

Paul’s signings include Bic Runga, Dave Dobbyn, Shona Laing and The Strawpeople.

“The location lends itself to a great place to enjoy a day of music. There’s tons of off-street parking and the opportunity to camp overnight”

“It’s not too big, it’s intimate and you have the incredible vista of the sounds hills as a backdrop,” he says.

Kicking off on Saturday 19 December, the first festival which will herald a mixture of New Zealand music royalty – with names to be revealed soon.

On 16 January 2021, the debut South Island performance of one of the hottest and exciting acts to emerge in NZ in the last 18 months will take to the stage, Paul says.

“As well as the music there will food and beverage stalls. If you want to camp overnight, it’s included in the ticket price.”

As Vice President of A&R for Sony/ATV Music Publishing, Paul runs his own PR and music consultancy firm and last year bought OpShop Lead Singer Jason Kerrison to Linkwater.

“As well as the music there will food and beverage stalls. If you want to camp overnight, it’s included in the ticket price, Paul says. “I want people to be able to relax, have fun and enjoy this beautiful slice of paradise.”

Tickets for the R18 events are $55 plus booking fee on Eventfinda.co.nz

“It was important that the tickets weren’t too expensive, we want this to be within reach,” Paul says.

Email Paul Ellis at [email protected] if you know of any local music talent. Tickets on sale today. Go to Eventfinda.co.nz

Saint Clair Vineyard Half Marathon organsiers Chris Shaw and Anna Polson have cancelled next year's event. Photo: Supplied.

Future of famous Marlborough marathon in jeopardy

Money woes have forced organisers behind one of Marlborough’s most famous races to pull the plug, with it’s long term future now uncertain.

The Saint Clair Vineyard Half Marathon has been cancelled for next year with promoters blaming the Covid-19 crisis for the change of heart.

Entrants will be refunded $30 from the average ticket of $99 as funds have already been spent preparing for this year’s race.

It has been an agonising decision to make, say co-ordinators Chris Shaw and Anna Polson who revealed refunding the entire fee would force the event into bankruptcy.

The pair have event insurance but pandemics are specified in the policy as non-payment events.

“We’ve put a lot of love and dedication into getting the race where it is today, and personally we’re devastated that our efforts have come to this. There have been some emails accusing us of being greedy and that makes me feel personally hurt.

“We’ve tried to be a generous member of the community and set out to give value back to the community. We haven’t just changed overnight.”

“We were hoping the event could take place in May 2021, but that’s not guaranteed by any means with the future of mass gatherings and events being so uncertain. We’re doing a good job at erradicating it [Covid-19] but,looking forward, we couldn’t say with any degree of certainty that we can hold it next year and to start preparing would be irresponsible, Chris says.

The event was originally postponed just days before lockdown officially begun.

All entries were transferred to a rescheduled race in May 2021 but that has now been shelved.

“We can’t be certain that the Vineyard Half planned for May 2021 will be able to go ahead either, so we will soon begin processing refunds to everyone who has entered this year’s event.

“We have agonised over the best process to refund and looked at the range of responses from other events.  We’re uncomfortable with the ‘refund nothing’ model, and ‘refund everything’ would simply bankrupt us; meaning you get nothing, and the Vineyard Half no longer exists,” Chris says.

All merchandise will be completely refunded, and organisers will donate any refunds not taken to race charity Bowel Cancer NZ.

The 14-year-old event has attracted thousands of people to the region and is a crucial way for Bowel Cancer NZ to raise funds.

Chris says he knows the lockdown has had an affect on the whole community.

“This has been an incredibly stressful and difficult time for us.

“We know everyone out there will be affected by this pandemic, so we hope you’ll understand how and why we’ve had to make this difficult decision.”

 

Viticulture cadet Jessica Marston features in a documentary about harvest at Villa Maria. Photo: Supplied.

Film first for vintage

A fly-on-the wall film giving viewers a behind the scenes look at vintage is set to make its screen debut.

Villa Maria has teamed up with an American filmmaker to create a feature length documentary, set to be released as the region gears up for its busiest time of year.

Titled Vintage, the movie followed staff from the Fairhall-based winery throughout vintage last year.

First timer Jessica Marston says she not only had her first harvest to cope with but a camera crew to contend with too.

“I didn’t want to do anything wrong; make a wrong move with harvest and I was more worried about that,” she says

The viticulturist, who graduated from Washington State University, says she was fortunate with her first harvest.

“I think I got quite lucky. Previous harvests sound like they were quite rough weather-wise. We also have a cool crew of people.”

Originally from Auckland, Jessica who graduated with a degree in viticulture and oenology has made Blenheim her home.

When she first heard about filmmaker Colin West’s concept for the film, she was keen to be included.

‘I like to talk,” she says.

The film also follows chief winemaker Nick Picone, viticulturist Stuart Dudley, chief viticulturist and Ollie Powrie.

It reveals how the team cope with unforeseen challenges, vastly varying climates, frost-filled early mornings and 24-hour-days.

Nick says it is the first time the vintage process has been captured on film

“For the first time ever in New Zealand, a winery is capturing the vintage process, peeking behind the curtain of the all-consuming harvest period known as vintage.

“You’ll see the passion and hard work that goes into every bottle.”

Director and producer Colin West says the film tells a uniquely Kiwi story.

“It captures the incredible highs and heart-breaking lows of making world class wine in New Zealand.”

“We hoped that everything would go well but we didn’t really know how vintage was going to unfold.  It’s so different from one year to the next,” He says.

Vintage will show on free-to-air television in a partnership with Three on Saturday 15 February at 10:30 PM.

Wine Station manager Michelle Osgood is looking for food truck chefs. Photo: Matt Brown.

An appetite for food truck comp

A Blenheim business owner is looking for food truck chefs to pit their wits and cooking talents against others.

The Wine Station in Blenheim will host an inaugural battle of food trucks in a bid to find the best food truck in the Top of the South.

Station manager Michelle Osgood says the event will also take advantage of 2020’s ‘extra Saturday’, falling on February 29.

She has been mulling over the ‘The Food Truck Off; Battle of the Whangamoas’ for around six months.

“We have had a lot of food truck events in the last two years, since we have been open, and we just wanted something that would sort of bring some different people to town,” she says.

“We also just wanted to get people together and have a street event, and that was the only way to do it.”

Open to food trucks based in Marlborough and Nelson, Michelle is hoping to attract around 20 to 30 operators.

A trophy is being made and donated by Havelock copper artist Tony Matthews, and attendees will be invited to vote for their favourite food truck.

“The idea is that maybe it will become a four-yearly event,” Michelle says.

It is also hoped that the event will attract more people to the region.

“I sort of envision that the food trucks will also get their followers to come along; the more of your own followers you have got, the more votes you’re going to get.”

Entry to the event will cost $10, with funds raised going to the Blenheim Rotary Club.

Running from 12pm and 7pm, it is hoped the event will appeal to both lunch and dinner time crowds, Michelle says.

“It’s really cool. I’m pretty excited, and I’m overwhelmed at how excited other people are,” Michelle says.

“It’s an extra Saturday that no one knew they had.”

Those interested in entering The Food Truck Off could contact Michelle directly via The Wine Station’s Facebook page, or via email; [email protected]