Boaties in Marlborough will be under the watchful gaze of automatic speed cameras. Photo: Supplied.

Speeding boaties caught on camera

Automatic speed cameras are catching out speeding boaties in marinas across Marlborough.

Hi tech cameras in Picton, Waikawa and Havelock Marinas are recording every vessel as it arrives and leaves.

Around ten people have been slapped with $200 infringement notices since the cameras were installed.

Acting Harbourmaster Jan Eveleens revealed the cameras have been calibrated to a high standard, like those used by police officers.

He says the Marlborough District Council funded cameras came after an idea to install signs like those that flash up speeds for motorists.

Acting Harbourmaster Jan Eveleens. Photo: Supplied.
Acting Harbourmaster Jan Eveleens. Photo: Supplied.

“I thought we should have them in the marinas, but they were not accurate enough.

“It’s been a bit of an experiment as they [the new cameras] were picking up waves and seabirds but they’re much better now, very accurate.”

The camera at Havelock was installed last winter while the Picton and Waikawa cameras were put up in December.

They record every vessels’ speed as they arrive and leave in the marina.

Boats going above the limit are instantly recorded and an alert goes to the Harbour Master.

Infringement notices are sent to boat owners by the council for breaking local bylaws.

Jan says people flouting the 8-knot speed limit as they arrive at Havelock Marina and the 5-knot limit in place at Picton and Waikawa will face fines.

“There have been some serial offenders but what we are seeing is that once word gets out is that people are slowing down.

“We had one boat coming into Havelock that drove straight into one of the beacons and the boatie hurt himself.

“People can hurt themselves if they are going too fast.”

The Harbourmaster will also monitor speed limits on the lower Wairau River from the State Highway 1 Bridge to below the Blenheim Rowing Club.

Jan says there have been reports of jet skiers on this stretch of the river going too fast.

The maximum speed in this section of the river is 5 knots.

“We want people to slow down and be safe,” he says.

Jessica Boyce has been missing since March 19. Photo: Supplied.

Birthday tribute for missing Jess

It was her 28th birthday, a day she should have spent with those who loved her, but instead those gathered remembered a girl conspicuous by her absence.

A vigil to mark missing Renwick woman Jessica Boyce’s birthday was held in Seymour Square in Blenheim on Sunday evening.

People gathered to remember the young woman they all know as Jess, to share stories about the “bright and bubbly” girl they all loved.

And as the chime of the last bell rang out from the clock tower at 7pm, a rendition of Happy Birthday filled the air, followed by a minute silence.

People gathered at Seymour Square to mark what would have been Jessica Boyce’s 28th birthday. Photo: Paula Hulburt.
People gathered at Seymour Square to mark what would have been Jessica Boyce’s 28th birthday. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Her close friend and cousin, Aaron Goodwin, says the event was a chance for people to reflect and share.

The family wanted members of the public to be able to attend as they have been “so helpful and supportive”, since Jessica’s disappearance in March last year.

Jessica went missing on March 19 last year. Her disappearance was upgraded to a homicide investigation in October.

Her case is now being treated as a homicide by Blenheim detectives in charge of the investigation.

Detective Senior Sergeant Ciaran Sloan says those responsible were likely acquaintances of Jessica’s.

Aaron, who grew up alongside Jessica, returned to live in Blenheim on Friday, moving back to the town he grew up in from Dunedin.

It’s been a “confronting” few days, with memories everywhere he looks, he says.

It was her friends who came up with the idea of marking her birthday.

Amid the stories shared and fond memories of the bright-eyed blonde, were tales of parties past.

Speaking to the Marlborough Weekly last year, Aaron described Jess as very sociable and easy to get on with.

The Help Find Jess website started by her family is now named Remembering Jessica Boyce.

She always believed the best in people, says Aaron.

“She was so innocently naïve and genuinely did not understand about consequences, but she was not the hard woman that some people seem to think she was.

“We’re talking about an almost 30-year-old woman whose favourite movies were old Disney ones.”

Her friends spoke of her fun-loving nature, her kindness and willingness to help. Her absence is felt by all who know her, Aaron says.

Marlborough District Council solid waste manager Alex McNeil at Blenheim’s recycling centre. Photo: Matt Brown.

Bigger bunker a boom for festive season

A giant new bunker used for recycled glass is open for empties – just in time for the busy festive season.

The Blenheim Resource Recovery Centre has nearly doubled its glass recycling capabilities thanks to a funds boost.

A $15,000 grant from the Glass Packaging Forum (GPF) plus $50,000 from Marlborough District Council paid for the new bunker.

Council solid waste manager Alec McNeil says that at this time of year the old bunkers would quickly full up.

However, by increasing the bunker size by 80 per cent, this should no longer be an issue, he says.

“The additional storage capacity for glass will ensure that the quality of cullet (recycled glass) being returned to O-I New Zealand (in Auckland) for processing is not compromised,” he says.

O-I New Zealand is the country’s only container glass manufacturer and uses recycled glass to make new bottles.

Glass must be sorted into clear, green and brown before it can be used to make new glass bottles.

Glass Packaging Forum Scheme Manager Dominic Salmon says the centre plays an important role in getting cullet from the South Island to Auckland.

“Funding projects like this, which result in improving the quality and quantity of glass available for recycling is a main objective of the GPF,” he says.

The GPF has help fund other projects in Marlborough, including rural recycling containers in Seddon, Okiwi Bay, Awatere Valley and Oyster Bay, as well as the new recycling hub at Havelock Marina.

Don and Maureen Helman. Photo: Matt Brown.

Recipe of thanks for paramedics

A man who collapsed at home has turned to a 58-year-old wedding gift in a bid to say thanks to the paramedics who rescued him.

Don Helman collapsed at his Blenheim home and a St John ambulance crew rushed him to Wairau Hospital.

The retired pharmacist has since made more than 2500 jars of marmalade as a way of raising funds for the St John’s team who came to his aid.

And to carry out this feat of kindness, he used a recipe book he and wife Maureen were given for their wedding more than five decades earlier.

Don says he told St John volunteers at their secondhand store in Springlands, “I could make you a jar or two.”

Ten pounds of fruit and eleven pounds of sugar goes into a batch of Don's famous marmalade. Photo: Matt Brown.
Ten pounds of fruit and eleven pounds of sugar goes into a batch of Don’s famous marmalade. Photo: Matt Brown.

“A particular morning, I walked across the kitchen and hit the floor,” he says.

“I said, send for an ambulance. They were here very quickly.”

A paramedic wired Don up to an electrocardiograph during the short ambulance trip.

“They put me on an ECG monitor, and on the way, they got something.

“The paramedic in the ambulance ran into the hospital and spoke with the house surgeon.

“When she came back, she said we think you need a pacemaker – we’re arranging for you to go to Nelson.”

Neither Don nor Maureen know who the “fantastic” paramedic was.

“She was just amazing,” Maureen says.

“She knew what was wrong with him more or less straight away.”

“They’re always there for an emergency,” Don says.

Ten pounds of fruit and eleven pounds of sugar goes into a batch – that makes about 27 jars.

Affectionately known as ‘the man’s marmalade’, the tasty spread is a favourite at the St John store.

Each batch takes around six hours to make and Don makes up to two batches a week.

He likes to have a supply ready to go when the shop sells out.

He uses lemons and oranges donated from neighbours’ trees.

“Our biggest bugbear is that the jars that we get – it’s lovely that we get the jars – but the labels are still on them.

“Before we can even start, we have to soak them and then scrape the labels off them.

That’s one thing we wish we didn’t have to do.”

The fruit is boiled first in its juice until the rind goes soft then adds the sugar and brings it up to the boil.

“It takes about an hour after that. It’s quite a long process – it takes about six hours, from start to finish.

“I had no idea how much marmalade people want, and it just grew really,” Don says.

The batch is then set aside in a back room overnight to set.

Maureen helps slice up the peel and with the testing process.

“Testing it. It’s bubble, bubble, bubble like a witch’s cauldron,” she says.

Don says he’s happy to be able to help.

“The marmalade is just repayment for what was done.”

Lee Griggs with his modified ‘backwards brain bike’. Photo: Matt Brown.

Backwards brain challenge

A mental health advocate known for his off-the-wall challenges is back on his bike – taking his fundraising efforts in a different direction.

Guinness World Record holder Lee Griggs, from Seddon, has unveiled his latest bid to help highlight mental health.

Using a new ‘backwards brain bike’ the intrepid adventurer will enter two of New Zealand’s most prestigious mountain biking events.

He says the mind-bending bicycle is a physical demonstration of neuroplasticity, or the brains ability to rewire itself.

Turning the bicycles handlebars left turns the front wheel right, and vice versa.

Lee says on a regular bike, your brain knows exactly which direction and with how much force is needed to subtly move the handlebars and pedals to avoid falling off.

“This just shows it all up,” he says.

“I’ve had to relearn how to ride a bike.”

The mechanism which reverses the steering on the ‘backwards brain bike’.
The mechanism which reverses the steering on the ‘backwards brain bike’.

In previous years, Lee climbed Mount Fyffe, in Kaikoura, on a pogo stick and cycled the punishing Molesworth track on a unicycle.

The handlebars on the bike, supplied by Blenheim’s Bikefit, are mounted on a specially designed clamp, designed by Cuddons, with gearing that reverses the handlebars direction.

He says participating in the two mountain-biking events is to show what the human brains is capable of, and its ability to change.

“You can take a really well rehearsed and practiced thought pattern you’ve had through life and exchange it for a new one,” he says.

“We all have the ability to change our thought patterns.

“It takes practice, hard work and consistency.”

Lee says there are two principles of neuroplasticity.

“Two neurons that fire together wire together, and the other is use it or lose it.”

“Like the muscles in our body, you use them and make them stronger, or they atrophy.

“If you don’t use the neural pathways in your brain, they become weaker.”

He says the project is to raise awareness about mental health.

“We are not our mental ill health.

“We can replace those anxious thoughts with constructive, resilient thought patterns.”

Lee wants to compete in the longest-running mountain bike event, the Karapoti Classic, a 50km event near Wellington at the end of February followed by the Motatapu in Otago, a 47km event.

“I want to showcase it at those events to raise awareness about mental health.

“On the smooth stuff, you react calmly but with the rough stuff, your brain flicks back to riding a regular bike.

“That’s the parallel, mental health isn’t something you deal with only when it’s tough.”

Lee and his ‘backwards brain bike’ will be on demonstration, with the opportunity to give it a go, at the Christmas Festival on Thursday.

“I would like to do a school tour afterwards and compete in the cyclocross series on the bike in June,” he says.

“Harcourts, Cuddon and Bikefit have joined the team, but I’m still looking for more sponsors to help us promote the message and get us to the events.

“And I’m looking forward to getting back to riding a normal bike.”

Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.

War time memories stolen in heritage heist

Precious war time memories, including a soldier’s medals and postcards home have been stolen by callous thieves.

A haul of heritage items has been taken from a padlocked storage container in Ward used by trustees from Flaxbourne Heritage Museum.

Items belonging to Private Arthur Wooding were among a cache of historical items swiped.

Arthur Wooding. Photo: Supplied.
Arthur Wooding. Photo: Supplied.

Flaxbourne Heritage trustee Sally Peter says she is struggling to put into words how upsetting the theft is.

“It’s a real violation. He served for future generations of the community to be here; they’ve taken something sacred away.

“We were looking after then for the future and I can’t help but blame myself for this,” she says.

The theft is believed to have happened between 23-24 November.

Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.
Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.

A book commemorating Arthur’s first communion at St Peter’s Church in Ward on 3 February 1929, four medals, a small uniform repair kit and a pair of binoculars are among items taken.

Sally says she had been going to pick items up from the container when she discovered the padlocks had been cut open.

The museum’s ANZAC collection had been near the doors as it is used every year to commemorate the special day.

“I don’t think they knew what they were looking for and think maybe they got a fright and ran off as there was heavy stuff left outside.

“The ANZAC boxes were close to the door as I use them every year for a display at Ward Hall.

Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.
Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.

“I feel I could have done better,” she says.

The Flaxbourne Museum collection has been stored in two shipping containers in Ward following the magnitude 7.8-magnitude earthquake in 2016.

Other items, not part of the Wooding Collection, were also stolen, including an intricately engraved cornet, once part of the popular Ward Band.

A lantern off the shipwreck Wakatu was taken in the break in and an old inkwell from Ward School.

Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.
Items belonging to Arthur Wooding have been stolen. Photo: Supplied.

Sally says telling Arthur’s family about the theft was “awful.”

“This was a box containing precious memories from a man’s time away fighting for our country, including his medals, photos, postcards, his sewing kit for quick mends, his binoculars, buttons, badges and other things pertaining to his years spent away.

“How low can you get and how dare someone violate this privacy and his memory.”

Police are investigating the theft and anyone with any information can contact police via 105.

Holly Ewens-Smith is grateful to the people who helped after she was involved in a car accident. Photo: Supplied.

Car crash casualty searches for mystery Samaritans

A woman left dazed by the side of the road after a car smash is trying to trace the good Samaritans who helped her.

Holly Ewens-Smith from Blenheim was driving towards Blenheim last Monday when she collided with another car.

The 26-year-old gym manager went into shock and was left with bruising and a sprained spine.

People who witnessed the crash at the intersection of Old Renwick and Murphy Roads in Blenheim were quick to help and now she’d like to find the mystery rescuers.

“I was really taken aback by the group of people that dropped everything to help on the scene and even to just sit with me and help me to catch my breath and calm down.

“It would be great to be able to say thank you and even if they don’t want to come forward, I hope they read this and know how thankful I am,” she says.

Holly says in the moments immediately after the crash she tried to open the driver’s door but found herself stuck.

An unknown man came to help and prised the door open, she says.

“I was quite panicked and tried to get out, but the door was jammed. This fella came from another car and he got the door open, got me out and sat me down.

“There was a lovely lady who sat with her arm around me and got me talking about other unrelated things until the ambulance arrived.

“My mum’s a paramedic but she was away on a course otherwise she would have heard it over the radio.

“I was very well looked after, there was also a young man who helped while we waited for the ambulance, I think he’s a rugby medic,” she says.

Holly, who moved to Blenheim from Auckland three years ago, says her car was written off in the accident.

She has had to take a week off work but hopes to be fit enough to return this week.

“The adrenaline stopped me feeling any pain for ages but when it wore off it was pretty painful and I’m still on pain killers, though not as many as I was.

“I really want to say thank you to these kind people who helped and let them know they made a big difference,” Holly says.

No charges have been laid in connection with the crash.

If you were one of the people who helped Holly and would like to get in touch with her, please email [email protected]

It’s hoped more staff on the ground will also help put an end to any anti-social behaviour. Photo: Supplied.

Ranger number boost in region

Extra council staff will be out over summer, doubling the region’s rangers.

Marlborough District Council got a funding boost of $183,610 to appoint two more rangers over the busy summer period, taking the total to four.

Rangers will visit camp sites and other spots to ensure things are running smoothly.

And it’s hoped more staff on the ground will also help put an end to any anti-social behaviour as they encourage people to be responsible campers.

Council’s reserves and amenities manager Jane Tito says there has been a big increase in the number of visitors camping at Marlborough’s responsible camping sites – up from 7,000 in 2016 to 12,000 in 2018.

“On top of the funding for additional rangers, council was also successful in getting funds of $25,000 from central Government’s Tourism Infrastructure Fund for a feasibility study on a long-term, sustainable approach to the management of responsible camping sites in Marlborough,” Jane says.

The study will also include consultation with iwi, the camping and motorhome associations and other interested groups.

Council’s Freedom Camping Bylaw 2012 was last reviewed in 2016 and the new review is scheduled to commence in July 2020, following the results of the study.

Marlborough Mayor John Leggett presents Nan Kahu Chadwick with her award. Photo: Toni Gillan.

Marlborough’s Living Culture Treasure sparkles

Her distinctive voice rings out clear, each note dropping into the silence of a spellbound audience.

Nan Kahu Chadwick is an inspiration to generations of people, her life devoted to the practice and preservation of te ao Māori.

Now the talented te reo Māori speaker, kapa haka teacher, composer and choreographer has just been appointed as a Marlborough Living Cultural Treasure.

Nan says everything she has done has been to honour her tupuna.

“I like to help people, help their journey be a good journey.”

Nan joins eight other Living Cultural Treasures.

Marlborough Museum ambassador Toni Gillan says a panel decided her contribution to the community deserved the recognition.

“It has always been my personal pleasure to contact the recipient of the award and tell them the news in person,” Toni says.

“This year was no different, and to see the surprise and delight on Nan’s face was very humbling.

“The Marlborough Living Treasure award is a wonderful way to acknowledge the extremely creative people in our community.”

Born Kahumarianatakutaioomoana Chadwick in Otukopiri (Koroniti) on the Whanganui River, Nan grew up speaking te reo.

Nan came to Blenheim in 1979, taking on a variety of teaching roles before joining Bohally Intermediate School’s bilingual unit as a kaiarahi i te reo Maori teacher in 1987.

For the first time, manystudents under Nan’s tuition began to discover for the first time who they were as she supported them to research and recite their pepeha, their personal introduction.

Thousands of Marlborough students lucky enough to attend Bohally in the 30 years Nan taught there were exposed to te reo and regular kapa haka performances.

“It wasn’t just the students – their parents and grandparents became involved in discovering who they are and what they did in their time. So many magic moments,” she says.

As a tutor and composer for Te Rerenga o Te Ra Flight Across the Heavens kapa haka group, Nan has led the group at performances on many civic occasions in Marlborough.

Te Rerenga o Te Ra has also represented Marlborough and New Zealand overseas, travelling to Germany in 2011, Norfolk Island 2013, to France and Malaysia in 2015, and Britain in 2017.

Nan continues to inspire future generations to speak te reo and learn about their place in te ao Maori.

Salvation Army major Deane Goldsack and social worker Bridget Nolan hope Marlburians will help them spread Christmas cheer by donating gifts for children. Photo: Matt Brown.

Operation Gifts for Kids

Hundreds of children who might otherwise miss out on a gift this Christmas are set to benefit from the Salvation Army’s toy appeal.

Staff have launched a public appeal for toys in a bid to spread Christmas cheer to those less fortunate.

More than 200 families are expected to receive brand new toys for their children as a part of the Christian organisation’s Operation Gifts for Kids.

Salvation Army social worker Bridget Nolan says the gifts go to families that are “doing it tough” over the holidays.

“The concept is a relief for families from the stresses of Christmas,” Bridget says.

“Things are coming up – uniforms, school camps, and they’re expensive.”

She says the support at the “stressful” time of year enables families to pay a bill or afford food instead of shelling out for pricey presents.

“And every child deserves a brand-new toy,” she says.

Eligible families are referred to the Salvation Army from other regional social services.

Salvation Army officer Deane Goldsack says their unique token gift system gives the decision on what their children receive for Christmas back to the parents.

Though the toy appeal has been running for several years, Bridget introduced a token system.

Inspired by the Dunedin Salvation Army and modified for Marlborough three years ago, the system enables parents or care-givers to personally choose gifts for their children from a room specially decorated for the occasion.

Each family gets a free family game and a free book, then, tokens are issued to the family.

Expensive toys cost more tokens.

Bridget says last year, 109 families and about 230 kids received presents through the operation.

And the number is expected to grow this year.

“The public and business supporters have been very generous in the past,” Bridget says.

“We’d like to say thank you to the past supporters in previous years and hope they can support again.”

Donations of new toys for children can be dropped to the Salvation Army Family Store, on Redwood Street, or the Salvation Army Centre on the corner of George and Henry Streets.

Financial donations for toys are also accepted.

This year, the Salvation Army are the recipients of the Kmart Wishing Tree – toys donated to the wishing tree will also go towards Operation Gifts for Kids.

To donate or for more information, call Bridget on 035780990.