Paula Hulburt

Paula Hulburt

Holly Ewens-Smith is grateful to the people who helped after she was involved in a car accident. Photo: Supplied.

Car crash casualty searches for mystery Samaritans

A woman left dazed by the side of the road after a car smash is trying to trace the good Samaritans who helped her.

Holly Ewens-Smith from Blenheim was driving towards Blenheim last Monday when she collided with another car.

The 26-year-old gym manager went into shock and was left with bruising and a sprained spine.

People who witnessed the crash at the intersection of Old Renwick and Murphy Roads in Blenheim were quick to help and now she’d like to find the mystery rescuers.

“I was really taken aback by the group of people that dropped everything to help on the scene and even to just sit with me and help me to catch my breath and calm down.

“It would be great to be able to say thank you and even if they don’t want to come forward, I hope they read this and know how thankful I am,” she says.

Holly says in the moments immediately after the crash she tried to open the driver’s door but found herself stuck.

An unknown man came to help and prised the door open, she says.

“I was quite panicked and tried to get out, but the door was jammed. This fella came from another car and he got the door open, got me out and sat me down.

“There was a lovely lady who sat with her arm around me and got me talking about other unrelated things until the ambulance arrived.

“My mum’s a paramedic but she was away on a course otherwise she would have heard it over the radio.

“I was very well looked after, there was also a young man who helped while we waited for the ambulance, I think he’s a rugby medic,” she says.

Holly, who moved to Blenheim from Auckland three years ago, says her car was written off in the accident.

She has had to take a week off work but hopes to be fit enough to return this week.

“The adrenaline stopped me feeling any pain for ages but when it wore off it was pretty painful and I’m still on pain killers, though not as many as I was.

“I really want to say thank you to these kind people who helped and let them know they made a big difference,” Holly says.

No charges have been laid in connection with the crash.

If you were one of the people who helped Holly and would like to get in touch with her, please email [email protected]

Villa Maria Estate are recalling a 2018 batch of sparkling rosé. Photo: Supplied.

Fizz loses sparkle amid safety recall

Glass damage to a 2018 batch of Villa Maria wine has seen bottles of the popular festive fizz recalled for safety reasons.

Company bosses at Villa Maria Estate are recalling a 2018 batch of sparkling rosé after glass damage on the lip of the bottles.

While the damage is thought to be limited to just some bottles, the entire batch is being recalled.

Villa Maria CEO Justin Liddell says no other products have been impacted.

“Although this issue only impacts a very small proportion of the unique bottles we use for our Villa Maria New Zealand Lightly Sparkling rosé 2018, customer safety and wellbeing are paramount so we are recalling the entire batch,” he says.

The damage has been discovered under the screw cap on some bottles of the 750mL Villa Maria New Zealand Lightly Sparkling 2018 rosé product.

The damage is on rosé batch number: VM101L9238.

“If you have purchased a 750mL bottle of Villa Maria New Zealand Lightly Sparkling 2018 Rosé since August 2019 we ask that you please refrain from opening the bottle and return the product to the retailer for a full refund,” Villa Maria says in a statement.

“You can locate the batch number at the bottom of the bottle which has been stamped onto the glass.”

“Villa Maria’s reputation as New Zealand’s most awarded winery is founded on the highest quality standards from the vines to the bottle,” says Justin.

The product was available from supermarket chains, various liquor outlets, Villa Maria Cellar Doors in Marlborough, Auckland and the Hawke’s Bay.

The wine was also sold at the Villa Maria wine sale which took place at the Auckland and Hawke’s Bay cellar doors. A small quantity was sent to Tonga and Fiji.

Villa Maria said they expect to launch our 2019 vintage of Villa Maria New Zealand Lightly Sparkling rosé early in December, and apologised for any inconvenience to consumers in the meantime.

For more information on the recall the public can contact the Villa Maria Customer Service team directly on 0800 900 013 or [email protected]

Marlborough Mayor John Leggett presents Nan Kahu Chadwick with her award. Photo: Toni Gillan.

Marlborough’s Living Culture Treasure sparkles

Her distinctive voice rings out clear, each note dropping into the silence of a spellbound audience.

Nan Kahu Chadwick is an inspiration to generations of people, her life devoted to the practice and preservation of te ao Māori.

Now the talented te reo Māori speaker, kapa haka teacher, composer and choreographer has just been appointed as a Marlborough Living Cultural Treasure.

Nan says everything she has done has been to honour her tupuna.

“I like to help people, help their journey be a good journey.”

Nan joins eight other Living Cultural Treasures.

Marlborough Museum ambassador Toni Gillan says a panel decided her contribution to the community deserved the recognition.

“It has always been my personal pleasure to contact the recipient of the award and tell them the news in person,” Toni says.

“This year was no different, and to see the surprise and delight on Nan’s face was very humbling.

“The Marlborough Living Treasure award is a wonderful way to acknowledge the extremely creative people in our community.”

Born Kahumarianatakutaioomoana Chadwick in Otukopiri (Koroniti) on the Whanganui River, Nan grew up speaking te reo.

Nan came to Blenheim in 1979, taking on a variety of teaching roles before joining Bohally Intermediate School’s bilingual unit as a kaiarahi i te reo Maori teacher in 1987.

For the first time, manystudents under Nan’s tuition began to discover for the first time who they were as she supported them to research and recite their pepeha, their personal introduction.

Thousands of Marlborough students lucky enough to attend Bohally in the 30 years Nan taught there were exposed to te reo and regular kapa haka performances.

“It wasn’t just the students – their parents and grandparents became involved in discovering who they are and what they did in their time. So many magic moments,” she says.

As a tutor and composer for Te Rerenga o Te Ra Flight Across the Heavens kapa haka group, Nan has led the group at performances on many civic occasions in Marlborough.

Te Rerenga o Te Ra has also represented Marlborough and New Zealand overseas, travelling to Germany in 2011, Norfolk Island 2013, to France and Malaysia in 2015, and Britain in 2017.

Nan continues to inspire future generations to speak te reo and learn about their place in te ao Maori.

The 93-year-old former nurses’ home at Wairau Hospital is being demolished. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Nurses’ home gutted as demolition begins

Demolition work has begun on one of Blenheim’s oldest heritage buildings, spelling the end of an era for the local landmark.

Workers moved in on the derelict Wairau nurses’ home last week to start stripping out the interior.

Specialists will then be called in to remove a significant amount of potentially dangerous asbestos discovered inside the 93-year-old building.

The red-bricked facility in the grounds of Wairau Hospital has lain empty for almost six years, costing health bosses around $30,000 to keep the building fenced off.

Nelson Marlborough health finance performance and facilities general manager Eric Sinclair says work is expected to be finished by March next year.

The building has sat vacant for several years. Photo: Paula Hulburt.
The building has sat vacant for several years. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Around $1million has been earmarked to pay for the work.

“Demotion of the Nurses Home at Wairau will take place over the next few months.

“Initially a soft demolition will occur – which is the removal of things like carpets, doors, toilets, pipes and roofing iron. After that the bigger machines come to site to deconstruct the larger elements,” he says.

Concerns over asbestos and seismic rating issues meant the former home would cost too much to address accessibility and fire safety problems.

Nelson Marlborough District Board staff decided demolition was ultimately a better use of public health funds.

Nelson Marlborough health finance performance and facilities general manager Eric Sinclair. Photo: Supplied.
Nelson Marlborough health finance performance and facilities general manager Eric Sinclair. Photo: Supplied.

The building’s foundation stone will be kept and installed with other historic foundation stones.

There is nothing else nothing else considered salvageable, Eric says.

“There are no other features considered worth saving on the house as the building was utilitarian in its original design.

“From it’s opening in 1926 the building provided a significant home and workplace for many staff who hold fond memories and interesting stories.”

There are several options being considered for the site when it is cleared.

The land could potentially be used for expansion in the future.

“A number of options are being considered but there is no urgency to determine future use.

“It is important to note that the location of the old nurses’ home was determined as the zone where any future expansion of Wairau Hospital would occur when the site master planning work was completed prior to the rebuild of the Wairau hospital 10 years ago.

“So, any use of the location will need to be cognisant of this master planning,” Eric says.

TJ’s Roofing staff stepped in at the last minute to help Pine Valley Outdoor Centre. Photo: Supplied.

‘Shining knights’ raise the roof and save the day

A Marlborough company has stepped in at the last minute to help a stricken charity looking to raise the roof – literally.

Dubbed ‘Knights in shining Coloursteel’ by a grateful Pine Valley Outdoors Centre Committee, staff at TJ’s Roofing quickly responded to a plea for help on social media.

The kind-hearted team turned up to put a new roof on the house destined for the popular outdoor centre after a contractor suddenly pulled out of the project.

Nicknamed Good Bones, the bungalow is set to become the new facilitator’s house.

Trust member Talia Burton-Walker says the team were left in a “bit of a bind”.

“Unfortunately, another Marlborough roofing contractor who had offered to install the roof had to pull out unexpectedly at the last minute, so, with all other aspects of the project ready to go to meet our timeline, we were in a bit of a bind.

“We put the word out on social media and TJ’s Roofing responded to our plight almost immediately.

We are incredibly grateful to them,” she says.

The relocated house, currently based at Coffey House Removals in Blenheim, will be transported to the Pine Valley Outdoor Centre next year.

Once there, it will become the home of Pine Valley camp facilitators and administrators, a position being created as part of an overall project to revitalise and future-proof the attraction.

The Pine Valley Outdoor Centre has been looked after by Pine Valley farmers Lloyd and Val Mapp for the past 35 years, who are now retiring.

“This building, and a facilitator on-site, means we can continue to keep the camp open and build on the wonderful facilities already there.

“Without this building we would have to consider closing the centre,” says Talia.

TJ’s Roofing owners Tim and Samiie Pine say they were, “very happy to help and to do something to support our community”.

Talia says the Marlborough community has been incredibly supportive of the house refurbishment, with offers of free or heavily discounted products, time and expertise.

“Roofline Marlborough supplied the roof, Marlborough Pre-Cut Ltd supplied the purlins and, Daveron Scaffolding the scaffolding.

“The team from G.K. Fyfe Painting Contractors have also generously donated 36 hours of paint prep to get the building ready for the painters.”

“This really is a project for the community, made by the community.”

To donate or assist with the refurbishment of Good Bones, email [email protected] or visit the Pine Valley Outdoor Centre Facebook page.

Hospice Marlborough’s volunteer coordinator Moerea Mustard is helping spread festive cheer for a good cause in partnership with Farmers. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas

Individually boxed baubles are for sale at Farmers in Blenheim for $10 each, with the option of adding a donation to Hospice Marlborough at the checkout.

This year’s design is the work of NZ artist Spencer Bellas. The ngaru, Māori for wave, represents the journey through life and the way waves moving together as whanau.

All proceeds from baubles bought at the Blenheim Farmers store go directly to Hospice Marlborough.

Robbie Parkes with his family dog has a secured a diabetic alert dog to from Australia. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Alert dog from across the ditch makes dream come true

The family of a young diabetic boy saving to buy an alert dog from Australia have secured their special pooch.

Four-year old Robbie Parkes from Linkwater and his family have been fundraising for the $20,000 dog after the youngster fell seriously ill earlier this year.

Diagnosed with Type-1 diabetes, Robbie needs the new furry friend to alert his family to any major changes in his insulin levels.

The dogs are not available in New Zealand.

After three months of frantic fundraising the relieved family have raised enough to buy the dog.

Now they have turned their attentions to getting Robbie over the ditch to train with is new canine companion.

Mum Diane Parkes says she is very grateful for the community’s support.

“There are some very special people out there who have been so supportive.

“In just over three months months, we’ve raised $20,000 for the dog which is now ordered.

“We were lucky to have so many items donated for auction we had too much, so we are having this second fundraiser.

“The funds will go towards getting Robbie to Australia at the end of training and to pay insurance for dog etc,” she says.

A quiz and auction night will be held at the Woodbourne Tavern on 29 November at 7pm.

Tickets are $20 each for tables of eight people and are available from All About You lingerie shop on Maxwell Road in Blenheim or through Diane on: 021 525 630.

Author Deborah Walton-Derry has been delving into the history of Broadbridge Transport. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Transporting readers back in time

One of Marlborough’s oldest transport businesses is set to grace the pages of a new history book, after a chance encounter in a pub.

When writer and historian Deborah Walton-Derry met Weir Broadbridge in the Cork & Keg pub in Renwick, he mentioned his interest in producing a record of his family business.

Although she wasn’t there often, Deborah says she kept seeing Weir and the plan for her new book was hatched and Highways, Byways and Detours was born.

The former copy writer’s fifth book will be published on Thursday, 28 November.

‘People say to me they’ve lived an ordinary life but no on has. People tackle things in extraordinary, life affirming ways.

“The brief was to stick to key things, the nuts and bolts of the business. In books such as these, it’s important that everyone maintains their dignity and respect all the way through and I’m very mindful of that,” she says.

The book took Deborah three years to write.

As with most of her writing work, she says she had to eventually “just let it go.”

“I know if I keep playing with it and changing sentences, it may never get done.

“I start at the beginning, with my research, and work through. This book’s not just about trucks, it’s about adventure, things that have gone wrong and what went right,” she says.

When she’s not writing, Deborah, who lives near Renwick manages and works on two vineyards.

Writing in the office can be difficult as she likes to devote at least a couple of hours at a time.

“I wait until I have a decent chunk of time and go to the office and know that I’ve got a couple of hours up my sleeve to do it justice,” she says.

‘It can be a bit of a juggling act.”

The livestock and log haulage business has a rich history that spans more than six decades.

In her book, Deborah takes an in depth look at its humble beginnings and impressive expansion, focusing on the people who were instrumental in its success.

She writes: “Cyril Broadbridge was a character. He loved boat racing – and he had a good ear for tuning engines even though he was not a trained mechanic.

“Cyril’s wife Hazel was a warm, kind-hearted woman who worked hard and combined helping run a transport business with bringing up seven children in challenging circumstances.”

Deborah’s book will be available to buy at Paperplus in Blenheim from Thursday following a launch at 5.30pm on Wednesday.

Chief customer officer Andre Gargiulo says the aim is to make the best mussel powder “in the world.” Photo: Supplied.

Seafood firm flexes mussels with multimillion-dollar venture

A seafood company has announced plans to invest $20 million dollars in a new Greenshell Mussels extract centre in Blenheim.

Sanford Ltd bosses revealed last week they would build a new Marine Extracts centre to boost their mussel powder power.

The move will create more jobs in the area and plans are already been drawn up for the centre which is set to open early in 2021.

It will focus on the discovery and production of high value nutrition products from New Zealand seafood.

Sanford already makes Greenshell mussel powder from a small facility in Blenheim and its success has convinced the company to go several steps further.

Chief customer officer Andre Gargiulo says the aim is to make the best mussel powder “in the world.”

Greenshell mussel powder. Photo: Supplied.
Greenshell mussel powder. Photo: Supplied.

“We want to make the best mussel powder in the world and more. The demand for marine extracts is huge and it’s only going to grow,” he says.

Greenshell mussel powder can help athletes combat inflammation issues and staff plan to start moving into the benefits of mussel oil.

“The plan is to move into mussel oil and look at extracts from marine species other than mussels.

“There is so much to unlock and we are incredibly excited about the potential,” says Andre.

More than 40 people will be employed in a wide range of roles from scientific research through to production.

Sanford’s current extracts business general manager of innovation, Andrew Stanley says Blenheim the “perfect” place for the new hub.

“It’s a great location. We already have all the natural ingredients just down the road growing in the Marlborough Sounds so it was an ideal location for us to choose.

“Blenheim is also an attractive place to live and that’s a very good thing given the number of highly talented people we will need to attract.

“The lifestyle here is amazing. I recently moved here from Auckland myself and I can vouch for the combination of open spaces, wine country and being near the sea,” he says.

Andrew says science at the new centre will be world leading.

“This is a fantastic new chapter and we’re stoked to be able to share it with the world.”

NZTA has proposed a change to the speed limit between Blenheim and Nelson. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Petition against lower speeds parliament bound

More than 17,000 people have signed their name to a petition against plans to slash the speed limit between Blenheim and Nelson.

Plans by the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) to lower the speed limit on SH6 to 80 kmh or less have angered many motorists.

And yesterday, a petition calling for the plans to be ditched was handed in to National MPs Chris Bishop and Dr Nick Smith to be presented at parliament.

Earlier this year, New Zealand Road Transport Agency revealed plans to look at lowering speed restrictions to help prevent fatalities and injuries on the region’s roads.

New restrictions could see State Highway 6 restricted to 60kmh in some places.

Nelson woman Stephanie Drewery started a petition on social media which quickly gathered support.

National’s Transport spokesperson Chris Bishop says the petition shows that any changes needed to be evidence based.

“The answer to better road safety between Nelson and Blenheim is not these blanket speed reductions.

“It is increased investment in road improvements, including more passing lanes.

“National is not opposed to speed limit changes that are evidence-based and focused on the most dangerous stretches of road,” he says.

Between 2009 and 2018, 20 people died and 92 were seriously injured in crashes on State Highway 6 between Blenheim and Nelson.

Nineteen of these deaths were on 100km/h stretches of SH6 and 87 people were seriously injured were on the open road/ 100km/ hour sections of SH6.