The team from Astrolabe joined staff at The Burleigh to pick up the coveted winner’s trophy. Photo: Supplied.

‘A prize worth savouring’

The winning pies were out in force and glasses of Riesling clinked in celebration.

Astrolabe’s Spätlese Riesling 2017 paired with The Burleigh’s Jamaican Lamb Pie is this year’s overall winner in the Great Burleigh Pie Pairing Challenge.

And delighted winners got together to mark the win and accept the sought-after trophy.

Astrolabe chief winemaker Simon Waghorn and the Astrolabe team turned out in force at The Burleigh to collect their winnings.

“Not to mince words, but this is a prize worth savouring”, he says.

Jane Waghorn-Forrest says Astrolabe organised “extensive” testing of Burleigh pies with the Astrolabe range of wines.

“We thought the sweetness of this wine would go well with spices.”

She says she is delighted the Spätlese Riesling won as it’s from her family’s home vineyard.

Judges Fiona Fenwick, Saulo Camillo, Summa Donald and Jesse Mulligan worked their way through 47 wine and pie pairings.

Marlborough Weekly owner Summa Donald says being picked as a judge was an honour.

“It was a tough gig, but somehow we managed try some of the best pies and wine Marlborough has to offer.

“Congratulations to the Astrolabe team and of course Burleigh for their fantastic selections.”

This is the fourth time the annual competition has been held.

All the entry fees go to charity, with this year’s recipient being Marlborough Foodbank.

Luke Romano wins another lineout at Lansdowne Park on Saturday night. Photo: Shuttersport.

Canterbury turn season around at Lansdowne

Tasman’s uninspiring Mitre 10 Cup premiership display against Canterbury on Saturday may not prove as costly to the Mako play-off hopes as initially thought.

Going into the 29-0 defeat at Lansdowne Park, Tasman, fresh off an away win over Wellington, lay second on the premiership points table, justifiably eying a home semifinal.

At the other end of the table languished Canterbury, an unfamiliar position for the perennial pace-setters, with the threat of relegation looming large.

Teetering above the trapdoor, the Red and Blacks responded by producing the sort of performance that has underlined their previous dominance of the provincial scene.

Their emphatic 29-0 victory at Lansdowne Park on Saturday evening appeared to have assured their participation in the top echelon next year and derailed Tasman’s chances of hosting a semi this season.

However, a combination of upset results in what is quickly turning into the closest premiership battle for many seasons has seen Tasman remain in second position at the end of the round, with Canterbury still equal bottom of the table.

Now, although they face a tricky away match against Otago on Saturday, the Mako at least have their semifinal future in their own hands.

Things were not looking so positive at the final whistle on Saturday though.

Putting their patchy form this season behind them, Canterbury took their frustrations out on a Mako side who undoubtedly knew what was coming, but were unable to match the defensive intensity and clinical finishing that came their way. Their unrelenting work without the ball quickly created hesitation in the Tasman attack, forcing them to chase the game from early stages, rather than build into it.

Given the familiarity of so many of the players through Crusaders connections, it was perhaps no wonder that, at times, it appeared as if Canterbury had read Tasman’s script.

The influence of former All Blacks Luke Romano and Mitchell Drummond cannot be underestimated. Pivotal players when Tasman lost to Canterbury in the 2018 semifinal, they repeated the dose. Romano’s disruptive lineout presence, ability to slow Tasman’s ball down and general work rate proved constant thorns in the home side’s flesh. Drummond continues to haunt his former home town team, pulling all the right strings with coolness, slick passing and clever kicking options.

The impact of the opening try, to Canterbury winger Ngatungane Punivai in the third minute, should not be underestimated.

It not only gave Canterbury the belief that they have been struggling for, it also put the Mako firmly on the back foot from the outset, a situation compounded by early injury concerns.

Mako lock Quinten Strange said while Canterbury, “with their backs to the wall”, played well, some of the damage was self-inflicted.

“We were just one or two percent off tonight, in a few areas of the game we were our own worst enemy. At set piece we weren’t executing … we were throwing those 50-50s a bit much, trying to score off first phases and they had a good plan, a good strategy.

“As we know, if you don’t turn up against Canterbury they are going to punish you.”

And that they did, Saturday’s defeat ending an 11-game winning run at Lansdowne Park, with Tasman’s last defeat in Blenheim coming against Auckland in September 2015.

However, if Tasman’s supporters have discovered anything about their team over recent years, it is their ability to rebound quickly from adversity.

In the age-old cliché, they “have plenty to work on” over the coming week.

No-one could fault their intent and effort on Saturday, but there seemed to be more spring in Canterbury’s step, perhaps a result of being pushed into a corner and facing a previously-unthinkable fate.

The Mako will be looking for the same desperation when they travel to Dunedin.

As Strange suggests, “it’s such a tight competition, whoever turns up on the day is going to win.

“That’s the beauty of this competition … we have to make sure we get the right mindset heading into next weekend.”

Mitre 10 Cup premiership table with one round remaining: Auckland 34, Tasman 29, Waikato 29, Bay of Plenty 26, North Harbour 25, Canterbury 24, Wellington 24.

Two generations of Whitney Street School pupils are looking forward to fireworks fun this Saturday night. Pictured from left are Naomi Barton and daughter Emilia, Deborah Barton, whose son Sidney is in the foreground, Huia Crosby with sons Maui and Tamiti, Andrea Craig with son Sam, and Jeff Valk with son George. Photo: Supplied.

Fireworks show sparks memories

Watching their children light up with excitement at the prospect of this weekend’s big fireworks show sparks memories for these parents.

They are all former Whitney Street School pupils and their children now attend the school too.

The fireworks event, Lights Over Marlborough 2020, is the school’s big annual fundraiser.

It’s on this Saturday night, with food carts, on-stage entertainment and lots of fun activities from 6pm, before the fireworks light up the night sky as darkness falls.

Organisers encourage people to come early and buy dinner on site, or bring a picnic, and enjoy the happy vibe.

Parent Andrea Craig says the school roll and the fireworks event had grown since her days as a pupil, but the community feeling of the gathering was just the same.

“It’s still a very relaxed evening out, there’s so much for the kids to do beforehand and the fireworks at the end are still really exciting.”

Back in the day, the event featured a massive bonfire in the school grounds.

These past pupils recall their parents bringing in their garden cuttings and piling them on the bonfire in the days leading up to the event.

Families would also make Guys at home and carrying them down the street to the school.

They recalled raiding their parent’s old clothes – ties, stockings and cardigans – and stuffing them full of scrunched up newspaper to create their “Guy”.

They also remember with amusement that attitudes toward safety were quite different in 1980’s New Zealand.

Huia Crosby says she can’t over emphasise just how big the bonfire was – one year the flames were enormous, creating a spectacle in the night sky that was as unnerving for some as it was exciting for others in the crowd.

These days Lights Over Marlborough is at a bigger venue and attracts about 5000 people depending on the weather.  KiwiPyro licences pyrotechnician Michelle Harris oversees the display.

Michelle grew up in Blenheim and remembers fondly attending the early displays at Whitney Street School grounds as a child.

Now she organizes the music play list to the rhythm of the fireworks display.

The event is organised by the school’s Parent Support Group and this year money raised will go towards an astro turf.

The postponement date in case of bad weather is Sunday 15 November.

EVENT INFO:

What: Lights Over Marlborough Fireworks display

Tickets: Free for children under five, $8 for adults, $35 for a family pass of up two adults and three children

Where: Marlborough A and P Showgrounds on corner of Maxwell Rd and Alabama Rd in Blenheim

When: Gates open 5.30pm for a 6pm start, Saturday 14 November, or if postponed Sunday 15 November

Why: Major annual fundraiser for Whitney Street School

Harbour Master Captain Luke Grogan is gearing up for what could be the busiest summer on record. Photo: Paula Hulburt.

Waterway speedsters warned

A clamp-down on waterway risk takers in underway as Marlborough braces for one of its busiest summers on record.

Marlborough’s Harbour Master Captain Luke Grogan and his team are targeting speeding hot spots.

The number of speed breaches is substantial and the potential for a fatality is growing, he warns.

Speeding hotspots in Havelock Channel and Waikawa will come under extra scrutiny as speed cameras are deployed.

“There are a lot of blind corners and people go through there at 30 knots.

“This will cause a fatality if there’s an accident,” Luke says.

Activity on the water is expected to rise this summer as people holiday in New Zealand rather than overseas.

“This year will be one of the busiest summers on record and there will be   lot of activity on the water.

“It will be awesome to see people coming to the Sounds and enjoying the Sounds.

“We want to encourage people to be safer and not just think of themselves but also others on the water and have that courtesy,” Luke says.

“People underestimate the risks. They just see a nice sunny day and head out into the blue. It’s easy to forget that they’re going off into the wilderness.

“If you add alcohol into that mix, then things are only going to escalate.”

Fully calibrated speed cameras put in place last year on the Wairau River have highlighted a growing problem with ski joy riders.

“We had a hunch, but the actual numbers are higher than we thought. A lot of families use the Wairau and rowers.

“It’s an accident waiting to happen,” Luke says.

With about 3000 square kilometres under his care, Luke is appealing for people not to take risks.

“Speed is the biggest problem. We’re increasingly spending our time trying to manage speed risks we see arising.

“Jet skis are more accessible, the barriers to entry you might get with a boat are not there and the temptation to hoon around is quite high.

“We’ve had a number of near misses, and also some serious injuries.”

For help and advice on how to safe on the water visit www.marlborough.govt.nz/environment/harbours/safer-boating

Marie Large and Abbie Large from Large's Rose Nursery. Photo: Malinda Boniface.

Tempting fete

Wet weather failed to dampen spirits at this year’s popular Rapaura Springs Garden Marlborough a fete as hundreds turned out in support.

The annual market featuring an array of stall holders from across Marlborough and further afield was held at Blenheim’s Pollard Park on Sunday.

Umbrellas and gum boots were the order of the day for many after a bout of wet weather overnight.

Showers cleared as the day progressed, with people happy to be out and about.

Foster Hope coordinator Leonie McLachlan is grateful for all the donations the charity receives.  File photo.

Hope for Christmas

Foster Hope Marlborough’s annual Christmas present drive is under way.

This year’s collection has a “B-awesome” theme with presents beginning with that letter needed.

The Marlborough Weekly is helping as a collection centre for donations.

From books, blankets, bubbles body care, beach towels, balls and board games, there are plenty of options for gifts.

All donations should be new and unwrapped, so organisers know the best person to get the gift.

Presents for children of all ages, both boys and girls, are needed to help make Christmas special.

Foster Hope believes that every child in foster care deserves to know that their community cares about them

Throughout the year they demonstrate this by proving children in care with a backpack of essential items, they are a symbol of our love and support.

Donations can be dropped off at Marlborough Weekly on 52 Scott Street or at 7 Philip Place by 30 November.

Wairau Valley batsman Tim Abrahams is bowled by Celtic spinner Josh Poole during the one-day final at Horton Park on Saturday. Photo: Peter Jones.

Lamb propels Celtic to one-day trophy win

Celtic are the Marlborough 50-over cricket champs after beating Wairau Valley by three wickets at Horton Park on Saturday.

In a low-scoring encounter, on to a Horton Park No 1 wicket which contained plenty of moisture and made free-flowing shot-making hard to accomplish, Celtic made the most of winning the toss.

Electing to bowl, they soon had Valley in trouble, removing opener Tom Leonard with just three on the board. Ben Ivory-McCullum and Luke Pannell played within themselves to push the score up to 22 before Ivory-McCullum perished.

Pannell, who finished as top scorer with 18 from 36 balls, began to form another partnership with Matthew Stretch before the youngster was bowled by impressive medium pacer Matt McCormick with just 40 runs on the board. The key wicket of Stretch followed soon after, caught at slip by man-of-the-match Jerrym Lamb from Jaden Adams’ bowling.

From then on it became a steady procession out to the middle then back to the pavilion for the remainder of the Valley order as they limped to 129 in 45 overs.

Celtic used seven bowlers who, backed up by some slick fielding, all bagged at least one wicket. Left arm spinner Josh Poole, who took 2-21 from his 10 overs, and medium pacer Adams, 2-23 from 10, picked up a brace apiece, while Lamb, with 1-12 from seven was the most miserly.

Elated with their fielding effort, Celtic were immediately put under pressure when it came their turn to bat. Openers John Porter and Logan Robinson were both bowled by the lively Bailey Andrews-Kennedy, leaving their side 2-3 after seven overs.

However the arrival of Josh Poole and Jack Holdaway steadied the ship, the pair taking the score through to 30 before Poole departed for 14. Holdaway then joined forces with Lamb and they began to turn the match around. When Holdaway was dismissed by Stretch for 24 from 72 balls they had lifted Celtic’s score to 70 and the platform for victory was set.

Reuben Kepes became Andrews-Kennedy’s third victim 15 runs later, Liam Young and McCormick came and went with the score at 111, but through it all Lamb remained calm and in control.

When Celtic achieved victory the vastly-experienced allrounder was unbeaten on 69, scored off the same number of balls, with six fours and two sixes.

For Valley, Andrews-Kennedy and Sam Boyce bowled accurately and economically, the former recording figures of 3-18 from his 10 overs, while Boyce claimed 2-18 from his full complement.

Next up for the club players is the first round of Tasman premier league play next Saturday.

Vineyard manager Kirsty Harkness has been using hemp to improve soil quality. Photo: Supplied.

Hemp heroine’s soil surprise

Emily Marten

 

A former nurse experimenting with hemp to boost vineyard soil quality has uncovered an unlikely bonus – skincare.

Marlborough vineyard manager and former nurse Kirsty Harkness was looking at ways to breathe new life into overworked soil.

Kirsty Harkness, Marlborough vineyard manager and former nurse co-founded cosmetic brand Hark & Zander after first planting hemp three years ago in a bid to revitalise overworked soil.

But what she didn’t expect was that it wouldn’t only be the soil that could reap the benefits of hemp:

It was an exciting discovery, she says.

“It wasn’t until I looked at hemp as not only a way of breathing life back into the soil but also as a potential secondary revenue source that I really got excited.

“Once we were confident the hemp wouldn’t take nutrients or moisture from the vines, we began looking at the potential benefits of hemp for the body as well,” she says.

Together with business partner Gabrielle Zander, an essential oil blending specialist, the duo founded cosmetics brand Hark & Zander.

The pair are combining hemp oil with a mix of their own essential oils.

Produced and made in New Zealand with the help of a team in Wanganui, the skincare range is sourced from local ingredients.

The fast-growing hemp industry could bring in a huge $2bn to New Zealand’s export economy.

But first hemp needs to ditch its negative associations with recreational cannabis, says Kirsty.

“Hemp is a variety of the Cannabis sativa plant species but it is grown for industrial uses and contains negligible amounts of the psychoactive compound THC.

“For New Zealand to take advantage of the billion-dollar export potential of hemp, we are going to need to grow mainstream acceptance of a product which was first used for industrial purposes thousands of years ago,” she says.

Daughter Emma Marris, and Father Brent Marris accept the 2020 Marlborough Wine Show, Champion Wine of the Show Trophy from Hugh Morrison. Photo: Richard Briggs.

Saint Clair big wine winners at Marlborough show

The wines and the founders of Saint Clair Family Estate shone at the 2020 Marlborough Wine Show,

Saint Clair took out the Pinot Gris Trophy with Saint Clair Godfrey’s Creek Reserve Pinot Gris 2018 and the Champion Other White Varietal Trophy with their Saint Clair Pioneer Block 5 Bull Block Grüner Veltliner 2020.

The company’s Wairau Reserve Sauvignon Blanc 2020 was awarded The Coterie Wine of Provenance, which recognises the best single vineyard current release wine from any class.

The Marlborough Museum Legacy Award for wines with pedigree, was awarded to Saint Clair Omaka Reserve Chardonnay for three wines produced over the last 10 years, (2007, 2013 and 2016).

Founders Neal and Judy Ibbotson were awarded the Wine Marlborough Lifetime Achievement award for their services to the Marlborough wine industry.

Council solid waste manager Alec McNeil says what the service might looked like would be clearer after the review process. File photo.

Wheelie bins proposal back from the brink

Wheelie bins are back on the table in Marlborough, with a waste review calling them an “ideal” solution to “inconvenient” bin bags and crates.

Marlborough District Council has been deliberating over wheelie bins for more than a decade, with the cost of rolling out close to 40,000 bins – two per household – a regular sticking point.

A look at council services in 2009 and 2010 ended up settling on recycling crates and a new resource recovery centre.

The idea was debated again in 2015, but shelved, then rehashed in 2017 after a survey of 5400 residents showed 39 per cent wanted the bins to replace their bags and crates.

Council concluded the price was too much for residents.

But another waste assessment compiled earlier this year could see them get over the line.

It showed residents believed the current system was “inconvenient” and had “outlived its useful purpose”, with wheelie bins the “ideal practical resolution”.

Some thought their recycling crates were too small for the amounts recycled, with some admitting their “excess” goods were put into bin bags, “lost to landfill for ease of disposal”.

Others pointed out that new housing developments in Blenheim and Picton had caused rubbish collection routes to grow, leaving recycling crates in the wind and rain longer.

Rain-soaked paper or cardboard could not be recycled, and recycling blown from the crates often became street litter.

“Recycling left beside the container is not removed by the contractor. People without access to transport cannot take excess product to the recycling centre,” feedback in the waste assessment says.

Residents also say the council-issued bin bags suited small households, not bigger ones, and should be biodegradable.

The assessment estimated it would cost $2 million to send out about 36,000 refuse and recycling bins in Marlborough.

Speaking after the assessment was adopted by council last week, council solid waste manager Alec McNeil says the $2m was a “best estimate”, which could change.

Whether wheelie bins meant higher rates depended on several factors, including rubbish volumes and the number of properties signed up to the service, he says.

There was also talk of a waste collection service involving boats for residents living in remote parts of the Marlborough Sounds.

Alex says what the service could look like would be worked out during the waste management plan process.

It also recommended councils were incentivised to collect food waste for composting, collect glass separately to other recyclables, and do more promotion to get people to sort their waste correctly.

About 4370 tonnes of waste was recycled in Marlborough last year, compared to 7615 tonnes sent to landfill.

Residents could submit feedback on the assessment’s proposals on the council website before November 16.

LDR - Local Democracy Reporting